Businesses sign up to town litter purge

Date: Monday 16th April 2018
Representatives of businesses which have committed to a Keep Penrith Tidy campaign receive certificates from Penrith mayor Scott Jackson alongside volunteer litter-pickers. Back row, left to right: Louise Armstrong, Roger Pickett, Darren Broad, of Argos, Mr Jackson, Lee Fleming, of M&S, Yvonne Taylor, of Morrisons, and Malcolm Carruthers and Brenda Hindmarsh, of Superdrug. Front: Joan Robinson and Kay Pickett.
Representatives of businesses which have committed to a Keep Penrith Tidy campaign receive certificates from Penrith mayor Scott Jackson alongside volunteer litter-pickers. Back row, left to right: Louise Armstrong, Roger Pickett, Darren Broad, of Argos, Mr Jackson, Lee Fleming, of M&S, Yvonne Taylor, of Morrisons, and Malcolm Carruthers and Brenda Hindmarsh, of Superdrug. Front: Joan Robinson and Kay Pickett.

PENRITH businesses have been part of a local community and council initiative to clean up litter around their stores and on their land.

M&S, Argos, Superdrug, Morrisons, KFC and Save the Children are some of the businesses and organisations that have taken action. In addition, M&S, Superdrug and Argos have put in place action plans to keep their areas clean in the future.

The “nudge” campaign, Keep Penrith Tidy: Love Where You Live, hopes to encourage everyone to do their bit, whether that is businesses sweeping outside their shops, people putting litter in bins or community groups tidying unloved areas.

“Even making sure the rubbish and recycling bags are sealed properly can make a huge difference,” said Meesh Ward, who has been nudging the businesses. “One of the main problems is rubbish bags put out too early or not sealed adequately.

“Litter is the one component of the environment that can be improved almost immediately and by the people themselves.”

Penrith mayor Scott Jackson said: “When the Britain in Bloom judges visit Penrith this year they will be looking to see how tidy we keep our town — from the industrial estates to Beacon Edge.”

Meesh added: “Towns and villages with litter are not pleasant places to visit and live in. It gives the impression that the community doesn’t care and discourages others from visiting, shopping or buying a house in the area.”