In this week in history 25 YEARS WHINFELL

Date: Tuesday 29th May 2018
“Thunderbirds are go” according to members of Langwathby WI who took the popular television programme as their fancy dress theme at Langwathby May Day 25 years ago.
“Thunderbirds are go” according to members of Langwathby WI who took the popular television programme as their fancy dress theme at Langwathby May Day 25 years ago.

A decision on the controversial £100 million plan for a huge holiday village in Whinfell forest, near Penrith, has been deferred by Eden planners — but not before the vast majority of councillors came out in favour of the scheme. Members of Eden Council’s Planning Committee want to draw up a draft 106 agreement aimed at ironing out concerns and worries, particularly over access on to the busy A66, before formally supporting the proposal, the largest the council has ever had to consider.

A decision on the controversial £100 million plan for a huge holiday village in Whinfell forest, near Penrith, has been deferred by Eden planners — but not before the vast majority of councillors came out in favour of the scheme. Members of Eden Council’s Planning Committee want to draw up a draft 106 agreement aimed at ironing out concerns and worries, particularly over access on to the busy A66, before formally supporting the proposal, the largest the council has ever had to consider.

PENRITH

Three talented sisters are hitting the high notes in the world of violin music. Lucy, Sally and Aimee Johnson, of Lowther Street, Penrith — daughters of violin maker and restorer Michael Johnson and his wife Elaine — have all been selected for prestigious musical events.

Penrith’s old swimming club is being offered a new lease of life as a tea room. The former swimming club building beside the River Eamont at Brougham is standing derelict, but plans for the new use have now been submitted to Eden planners.

APPLEBY

A new range of healthier menus to be used throughout primary schools in Cumbria was launched at Appleby. The launch had the help of Beatrix Potter’s Peter Rabbit and a cake to celebrate the character’s 100th birthday. The menu idea is a culmination of market research among parents which showed they wanted an improved choice of healthier options for their children, including more vegetables.

KESWICK

A cup once won by Beatrix Potter was presented at Keswick May ram fair by a local farmer who himself won the trophy ten times between 1934 and 1956. The Edmondson Cup is presented every year for shearlings at the show but because of its value the winner will now be given a replica to take home. The cup was first presented in 1928 by Mr. Thomas Edmondson’s widow in memory of her husband.

Keswick’s second jazz festival is another sell out success. Organisers are already looking at options for extending next years event to six or even seven days.

The three Keswick first schools are all planning events to mark the end of their final year before being merged in September. Brigham, Crosthwaite and St. John’s schools are being replaced by the new St. Kentigern’s First School which is under construction next to Trinity Junior School.

50 YEARS

LANGWATHBY

The temporary bridge over the Eden at Langwathby was winched into position. The light box girder “nose” was used to bridge the gap and was then followed by the bridge proper. The “nose” is now being dismantled and a further section of the bridge added and pulled across the river. A concrete roadway will be laid over the steel gurder forming the floor of the bridge.

PENRITH

Regret at the lack of progress with the project to provide Penrith with a swimming bath was expressed at the Urban Council meeting by the Chairman of the Parks Committee, Mr. Geoffrey Johnston. He said the delay was beyond the Council’s control. They had done everything they could to get the scheme off the ground.

Mrs. Gladys Mary Wilson, wife of the Prime Minister, told the writer of an illustrated feature article in “The Sunday Times” magazine that when she left the Gregg School in Carlisle she would have liked a job on a newspaper like the “Herald.” Mrs. Wilson’s father, the Rev. Daniel Baldwin, became minister of the Penrith Congregational Church in 1928, when Mrs. Wilson was twelve.

GREAT SALKELD

Fifteen-year-old Michael Armstrong, Wolfa, Great Salkeld, outclassed older competitors to gain selection for the British Friesian judging team at the Royal Show.

KESWICK

A man with an unusual hobby is Mr. Edwin Barron, of Heads Mount, Keswick. By day Mr. Barron is a car park attendant but in his spare time he builds intricate models of local bridges which serve as novel plant stands. Mr. Barron uses Lakeland stone which he cuts into small blocks needed for the models. The finished articles are colourful and attractive and are in great demand by visitors.

100 YEARS

PENRITH

Miss Dawson-Scott, Brent House, one of the founders of the Penrith Women’s V.A.D. in 1911, has left for the south, having been appointed commandant of a large hostel at the Australian Military Hospital, Southall.

A retired policeman and his wife, Mr. and Mrs. Wilkin, James Street, have celebrated their golden wedding. Mr. Wilkin joined the police in 1870 at Whitehaven, and has served at Seaton, Pooley Bridge and Workington. He is now a probation officer for the Leath ward.

WARCOP

A kick by a pony in a field at Warcop resulted in the death of five-year-old Ernest Robert Beatham, Warcop. The pony struck out with its hind leg and hit the boy on the head, knocking him over. He died later in the Cumberland Infirmary. At the inquest the jury returned a verdict of “accidental death.”