In this week in history 25 YEARS TEMPLE SOWERBY

Date: Friday 8th June 2018
Ullswater High School, Penrith, pupils at work on their environment week project 25 years ago.
Ullswater High School, Penrith, pupils at work on their environment week project 25 years ago.

Batsman Terry Geer faced a delivery of a whole new kind during a cricket match at Temple Sowerby. A stray hang-glider headed straight for him as he stood at the crease! Terry, who was playing for Stainton in an Eden Valley League match, and the Temple Sowerby fielders were well and truly stumped as they watched the hang-glider approaching the field. “I dived to the ground for cover and it missed me by a couple of feet and then rose slightly before landing in the next field,” he said.

Batsman Terry Geer faced a delivery of a whole new kind during a cricket match at Temple Sowerby. A stray hang-glider headed straight for him as he stood at the crease! Terry, who was playing for Stainton in an Eden Valley League match, and the Temple Sowerby fielders were well and truly stumped as they watched the hang-glider approaching the field. “I dived to the ground for cover and it missed me by a couple of feet and then rose slightly before landing in the next field,” he said.

PENRITH

Tough tactics to combat crime are being promised by Penrith and the Border MP David Maclean, only hours after his appointment as law and order minister at the Home Office. “The Government expects a tough line on law and order and we will have to deliver it,” he told the “Herald”.

TEBAY

Transport has been the lifeblood of Tebay for 150 years but originally the village depended on the railway for its prosperity. The London and North West railway was completed in 1846 but Tebay gained greatly in importance fifteen years later when it became the junction of the South Durham line with the LNWR.

KESWICK

Keswick’s annual May ram fair attracted a fine selection of Herdwick rams. The event, which is guaranteed a site in Keswick by a charter dating back to the 1600s, has been held on Town’s Field for many years. Sheep breeders from all over Cumbria visit the show which in the past included sheep owned by Beatrix Potter.

LONG MARTON

Almost fifty years ago a chance meeting with two young boys on a beach in Norway led to a wartime friendship between John Rawlings and a British family living under the shadow of German occupation. Now Mr. Rawlings and his son Bob, both from Long Marton, are flying out to Bergen, Norway, to try and find the family who lost touch with Mr. Rawlings more than thirty years ago.

APPLEBY

Plans for new toilets at Appleby costing about £127,000 have been revealed. New public conveniences will be sited next to the Broad Close car park on the King George V playing field. Designed by Eden Council architect Graham Norman, the toilets are said to represent an important step forward in the authority’s ongoing program of upgrading public conveniences.

50 YEARS

PENRITH

With the roar of bulldozers dinning in their ears, two housewives said that they intend to continue the fight to retain a wall which is sought by Penrith Urban Council to gain access to their new Pategill housing estate. The wall, at the end of Carleton Drive, is jointly owned by the two householders living closest to it, and their wives, Mrs. Hilda Dixon, at No. 37, and Mrs. Eleanor Tyson, at No. 56, lead a campaign which has the support of many other residents on the street. Mrs. Dixon alleged the council was ignoring the fears of residents — including the possible devaluation of their homes — in order to acquire cheaper access.

Penrith traders who have been keeping their shops open six days a week have been breaking the law. The proprietors have now been given official warning that they must close their premises on one half-day a week. The decision to keep open all week was taken by some of the larger firms when the town’s half-day was changed from Thursday to Wednesday. By sending half their staff on holiday one afternoon and the other half on another day, they have provided a service all week.

A career with the Northern Gas Board which began as a boy of 15 ended 44 years later for a Penrith man. Mr. John (“Jack”) Smith, Tyne Close Avenue, retired from a job which has taken him over a wide area of Cumberland and North Westmorland. Mr. Smith began work in the Penrith branch of the Gas Board almost immediately after leaving school.

MAULDS MEABURN

The villages themselves may not have changed in half-a-century, but village life had, according to a former North Westmorland man who was on his first visit to his native area since emigrating to Canada in 1920. “I went to see Maulds Meaburn where I was born and most of the old places were still there. But there was not much life about and on the green where we used to play football, there were just dozens of sheep,” said Mr. James Betham.

100 YEARS

PENRITH

A cow which was being driven through Penrith broke loose from its companions and invaded the Conservative Club where the Government department for agricultural feeding stuffs is housed, and which handles the rationing of cattle cake. Evidently the cow was intent on inquiring for its rations, but it was ejected before it made any disturbance over the matter.

WARCOP

Captain M. Wynne, son of Sir Arthur and Lady Wynne, caused considerable excitement by landing an aeroplane in a field near Eden Gate. The plane had come from Shrewsbury, a distance of 150 miles, and on the next day it made the return journey. Quite a large crowd assembled to watch the ascent.