In this week in history 25 YEARS PENRITH

Date: Monday 3rd December 2018

What is television superstar Sir David Frost giving friends like Elton John, John and Norma Major and Mr. and Mrs. Roger Moore for Christmas? The answer is a 3lb. box of handmade fudge from Penrith’s Toffee Shop, where staff are working flat out to meet an unprecedented seasonal demand.

What is television superstar Sir David Frost giving friends like Elton John, John and Norma Major and Mr. and Mrs. Roger Moore for Christmas? The answer is a 3lb. box of handmade fudge from Penrith’s Toffee Shop, where staff are working flat out to meet an unprecedented seasonal demand.

Originality on a festive theme was the keynote to success in the Penrith Chamber of Trade Christmas window dressing competition. Those responsible for brightening town windows had obviously given a great deal of thought and effort — with one knitting for her window since August and another travelling to Morocco to specially choose items.

First World War hero Robert Matthew Beatham is to be remembered through the naming of a new Penrith development. Members of Eden Council’s Works and Leisure Committee agreed a street naming request from Peter Tolmie Limited for their recent development off Scotland Road. Supporting the name, Arthur Stamper, Penrith, said it would honour a Glassonby-born war hero whose headstone was at Addingham church yard.

TEMPLE SOWERBY

Roads and traffic minister Robert Key ruled out any further improvements to the A66 between Penrith and Scotch Corner. However, the Department of Transport confirmed that existing schemes in the A66 program, including the Temple Sowerby bypass, would go ahead.

EDEN

Eden can forget its hopes of becoming a unitary authority, according to local government review commissioner Ann Levick. Council chairman Mr. Eric Wooff reported the news to fellow councillors. He said that in a “frank and forthright” discussion, Mrs. Levick had said Eden was too small and had also indicated it was “highly unlikely” the status quo in Cumbria would be permitted.

KESWICK

A climbing wall development at Keswick which is at the centre of a planning wrangle was officially opened. The £100,000 wall, called Rock at the Warehouse, is the fourth largest climbing wall in the country and has been welcomed by local climbers.

A Keswick quiz addict came top in a popular television quiz show. It was the realisation of an ambition for Alyson Lehninger to be chosen to appear on a television quiz and raise money for charity at the same time. Colleagues and friends sponsored her for Channel Four’s “Fifteen to One” program and the proceeds will be given to local charities by Keswick Lions Club.

The offer of land at Lakeside, Keswick, for a proposed new theatre has received the Government’s stamp of approval. The Department of the Environment has agreed that Allerdale Borough Council can lease the site to the project for 125 years at a “peppercorn” rent.

APPLEBY

Ron and Mary Haworth celebrated 25 years behind the bar at the Hare and Hounds, Appleby. They came to Appleby on 4th December, 1968, from Overton, near Morecambe. Mr. Haworth was a master builder but he worked part-time in public houses, as did his wife, so they decided to have one of their own.

50 YEARS

KIRKBY THORE

The sixty-odd families drawn from many different parts of the country who moved into the ultramodern terrace blocks at Sanderson’s Croft housing estate are quickly forging themselves into a community, with three main things in common. The heads of all the households are employed at the British Gypsum works just down the road. All have had some complaints to make about their new homes and, although some families have been living there since about April, some are still waiting for complaints to be attended to.

SOUTHWAITE

The Minister of Transport, Mr. Richard Marsh, has been asked to think again about what has been described as a wrong decision about the site for a service station on the M.6 motorway at Southwaite. The M.P. for Penrith and the Border, Mr. William Whitelaw, has written to him telling him that local residents have the strongest objections to the site. It is claimed that the selected site will cut across three small farms and that an alternative site a mile away, to which there is no engineering objection, would cause no opposition.

SKELTON

Members of Skelton Women’s Institute are spending hours of their spare time helping to keep alive an old Cumberland housecraft — by plaiting long sections of binder twine! The twine is being used to make attractively designed mats which are not only hard-wearing but cheap. The activity resulted from some members visiting the Westmorland W.I. Federation’s handicraft exhibition in Kendal where they were impressed by the mats on display.

100 YEARS

PENRITH

Owing to the influenza epidemic having affected members of the printing staff, the “Herald” was finally printed by the Carlisle Journal. The obituary column included notices of 37 deaths, mostly due to the epidemic, plus seven notices under the heading “Died on Service.”

The Highways Committee of the Urban Council, which comprises practically the whole Council, have decided to send forward a scheme which embodies the building of twenty artisans’ houses in Penrith. Many soldiers returning married from the war, or who are considering marriage, are finding that houses are not to be had in the town.

KESWICK

Ronald Lupton, son of Mr. J. W. Lupton, Lower Market Square, has been elected to a Hastings Exhibition of £100 a year, for four years at Queen’s College, Oxford. This is the third time that Keswick School has won this honour.