In this week in history 25 YEARS PENRITH

Date: Monday 26th November 2018

Street surveillance cameras in Penrith town centre could be used as an excuse to remove more policemen from the beat, Eden councillors were warned. The comments came from Eden works and leisure committee member Bryan Nicholls, a town teacher and former Cumbria police sergeant, as he and fellow members discussed proposals to install crime prevention cameras in Penrith.

Street surveillance cameras in Penrith town centre could be used as an excuse to remove more policemen from the beat, Eden councillors were warned. The comments came from Eden works and leisure committee member Bryan Nicholls, a town teacher and former Cumbria police sergeant, as he and fellow members discussed proposals to install crime prevention cameras in Penrith.

Penrith shoppers are to switch on to a £10,000 Christmas build-up. Months of preparation have gone into the official switch-on of the festive lights and an associated publicity campaign. The total bill is expected to be more than £10,000.

Bill and Bertha Davidson had a pleasant surprise when a telegram from the Queen congratulating them on their diamond wedding anniversary was delivered to their home at Castle Drive, Penrith. It was one of many cards and good wishes the cheerful pair received from friends and neighbours. Mr. and Mrs. Davidson, who sold government surplus and second-hand clothes from the front room of their home in Castlegate for nearly fifty years, celebrated the occasion with a family meal. Mr. Davidson is a well-known photographer whose pictures have appeared on record labels, books, advertisements, chocolate boxes and calendars all over the world.

EDEN

After more than a century of tradition, the Vale of Eden Band of Hope Union are to abandon their annual demonstration and look for a new way of spreading the message of the harm caused by drink and drugs. The 121st annual demonstration was held at Appleby in June as usual, but an open meeting at Kirkby Stephen decided no further demonstrations should be staged.

Fund-raisers throughout Eden adopted many shapes and sizes as they joined in the televised Children in Need appeal. Sponsored activities included three-legged walking, Penrith’s longest painting, walking to work in fancy dress and fancy dress pub crawls.

GARRIGILL

Talented Garrigill film student James Bell has been honoured by the Royal Television Society. James, the third son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bell, of Crops Hall, Garrigill, is studying film at Carlisle College of Art.

BRAITHWAITE/

THORNTHWAITE

After a sudden change of heart by British Gas, residents of Braithwaite and Thornthwaite have been told they have one last chance to obtain a mains gas supply. British Gas Northern originally announced that there was not enough interest to cover the costs. They wanted 75 per cent. take-up by householders. However, after intervention by local MP Dale Campbell-Savours they have agreed to carry out another survey and say they will now supply gas to both villages if at least 30 per cent. of households commit themselves to a connection.

BORROWDALE

Borrowdale Parish Council have withdrawn funding from the valley school because councillors feel that contributions by valley residents should be entirely voluntary. At an emotionally charged meeting of the council there were accusations of blackmail when one councillor said the future of the school depended on the money raised locally from council tax.

KESWICK

A Keswick businessman has helped a local lady achieve her ambition of enjoying views of Derwentwater in comfort. Felicity Bolton wanted to donate a seat to the National Trust to be used on land by the shores of the lake. However, the Trust, who receive more than 200 offers of seats each year, said they would be unable to place the seat near the Hawes End landing stage.

50 YEARS

PENRITH

The main source of trouble on the Penrith motorway by-pass, opened just over two weeks ago, is people who should not be there at all — pedestrians. Supt. Ronald Willatt, in charge of the traffic department of Cumbria Police, said this week that offences on the by-pass in the first ten days after the opening were headed by cases of trespassing by pedestrians, of which 13 had been reported.

MURTON

Just a few months after £200 had been spent on repairs and improvements, fire gutted the village institute at Murton. The former Army hut of World War I, bought by the villagers and erected at Murton in 1922, was later described as “a total loss” by the chairman of the committee, Mr. Edgar Hinchliffe.

OUSBY

A coachload of parishioners from St. Aidan’s Church, Barrow-in-Furness, en route for Ousby for the induction of their former Vicar, the Rev. Gordon Lambert, were dismayed when their coach broke down on the outskirts of the village. However, after a “local” told them that the church was only a few hundred yards down the road, many decided to walk. But they had reckoned without a little Cumberland exaggeration, for the church was, in fact, about three miles down the road, and it meant a long tramp down unknown lanes in pitch darkness! Fortunately, the news reached the village and pick-up cars were immediately despatched to collect the unlucky visitors.

100 YEARS

PENRITH

In his notes on the end of the war, “Silverpen” writes: “The area covered by this newspaper has made no mean contribution to the price of victory. We have no complete record of the total casualties, but out of something like 1,000 photographs of soldiers published in these columns since the war began, 650 of those soldiers, officers and men, were actually killed, and about 70 represent missing and prisoners. These photographs by no means exhaust the list of killed or missing, for in many cases no photos were available. It proves that this portion of Cumberland and Westmorland suffered very heavily. Penrith and Keswick have each a long roll of honour, but for its size, Keswick probably holds the palm, unless it is Shap, which has a record quite out of proportion to its population.”

The epidemic of influenza has taken its toll of many victims in the Penrith district during the past week, and burials during the past fortnight have numbered 22, whereas the normal weekly average is only three.