In this week in history 25 YEARS PENRITH

Date: Monday 1st October 2018

A resident of Penrith’s Greengarth home for the elderly was riding high on his 89th birthday when he was whisked away by carriage driving supremo George Bowman. Jack Bewley, a retired tenant farmer from Stainton, has followed the success of Mr. Bowman for many years and often watches him riding past the home where he has lived since 1991 when his house in High Hesket was damaged in a fire.

A resident of Penrith’s Greengarth home for the elderly was riding high on his 89th birthday when he was whisked away by carriage driving supremo George Bowman. Jack Bewley, a retired tenant farmer from Stainton, has followed the success of Mr. Bowman for many years and often watches him riding past the home where he has lived since 1991 when his house in High Hesket was damaged in a fire.

Penrith Queen Elizabeth Grammar School’s first XV have been named team of the month for November by national Rugby Union publication Rugby World and Post. Over the last two seasons the team have lost only four matches out of a total of 48. Last season they were defeated just once, by Royal Grammar School, Newcastle.

KESWICK

Purchase offers have been accepted for the three former Keswick primary schools which have been replaced by the new St. Kentigern’s school. Although the identities of the successful tenderers have not been revealed, because the deals are still subject to contract, there is an indication that one of the schools, Crosthwaite, is being bought for a community use.

A tall fence costing as much as £1,750 is needed to stop footballs travelling from Walker Park, home of Keswick Football Club, into an adjoining caravan site. Keswick Town Council are looking at options for a fence in order to prevent damage to the caravan site.

EDEN

Eden Council’s community charter was officially launched by Penrith and the Border MP David Maclean. The charter sets out the services provided by the council for those who live and work in the district or simply visit it. It includes a brief resume of each service, together with an outline of standards which the council seek to achieve.

CUMBRIA

Members of Cumbria’s police committee are calling on the county council to provide the necessary funding to keep up the force’s strength. The call followed a warning from Chief Constable Alan Elliott that county cash cuts could cost the Cumbria force up to 112 police officers.

KIRKBY STEPHEN

Some 154 horses and ponies came under the auctioneer’s hammer during the annual Penrith Farmers’ and Kidd’s Cowper Day horse sale at Kirkby Stephen. The days when horses used to gallop down the main street are long gone, but the sale still provides a rich insight into former traditions.

TEMPLE SOWERBY

Piecemeal improvements to the A66 could well increase traffic dangers on unimproved sections, Department of Transport officials have been told. Concern was expressed at the opening of the three-day public consultation, at Temple Sowerby, over a proposed route for a bypass of the village.

50 YEARS

ULLSWATER

A proposal by the Ullswater Ski Club to build changing accommodation and toilets on the site they occupy on the lake shore at Howtown has resulted in residents of the area organising a petition against the plan and also calling for the total prohibition of water ski-ing on the lake. A letter signed by some thirty residents in the Howtown area has been sent to the Lake District Planning Board, Westmorland County Council and the Ullswater Preservation Society objecting to the proposed buildings and protesting against the indiscriminate increase in water ski-ing on the lake.

PENRITH

According to Penrith’s Chief Public Health Inspector, Mr. R. N. Sharp, 1967 was a “disappointing year for house building” in the town. A total of sixteen houses were completed — three for the Council and 13 for private developers. Since the war 1,040 houses have been built in the town, 606 by the Council and 434 privately.

LONG MARTON

A blaze destroyed 1,500 bales of new hay stored in a barn at Midtown Farm, Long Marton, belonging to Mr. Edward Bellas, Croft Ends, Brampton, Appleby. Mothers taking children home from school first spotted the fire and brigades from Appleby and Shap were called.

APPLEBY

Celebrating their 55th wedding anniversary are Mr. and Mrs. A. E. P. Slack, Wemyss House, Appleby, a couple known throughout North Westmorland in farming circles and for Mr. Slack’s lifelong interest in public affairs. Twice Mayor and Mayoress of Appleby, Mr. and Mrs. Slack retired from active farming at Castle Bank in 1964, but at 79, Mr. Slack has not let his interest drop. Their recipe for a long and happy marriage — co-operation. Mr. Slack says that they have had arguments of course, but have always agreed to differ.

100 YEARS

PENRITH

“Silverpen” writes: “We may soon require a clog controller in the Penrith district. Owing to the drafting into the Army of all the young boot and clog repairers, the country people complain that it is impossible to get their repairs done. The business has been so drained of men left in Penrith to cope with the particular class of work that our agricultural friends will soon be living in a land where clogs have ceased to clatter.”

CALTHWAITE

A Canadian newspaper says that Miss Frances Foxcroft, late of Calthwaite Post Office, and at present telephone operator at the Labour Temple, Vancouver, was the recipient of a handsome gift from the Businesses Agents’ Association of Vancouver, in recognition of her bravery in the recent riot when she prevented Secretary Midgley from being thrown from a window.