In this week in history 25 YEARS PENRITH

Date: Tuesday 8th May 2018
Teachers and children from Patterdale School set off on a sponsored walk for school funds 25 years ago. Following a steamer trip round Ullswater, they went from Glenridding to Howtown and back to Patterdale. It was organised by school support group members Avril Brown and Diane Halliday and sponsored by bakers Birkett’s, who provided biscuits and cake.
Teachers and children from Patterdale School set off on a sponsored walk for school funds 25 years ago. Following a steamer trip round Ullswater, they went from Glenridding to Howtown and back to Patterdale. It was organised by school support group members Avril Brown and Diane Halliday and sponsored by bakers Birkett’s, who provided biscuits and cake.

The controversial decision to allow selection of pupils at Penrith Queen Elizabeth Grammar School is to be challenged in the courts. Cumbria County Council formally got leave to apply for a judicial review of the Secretary of State for Education John Patten’s decision.

The controversial decision to allow selection of pupils at Penrith Queen Elizabeth Grammar School is to be challenged in the courts. Cumbria County Council formally got leave to apply for a judicial review of the Secretary of State for Education John Patten’s decision.

APPLEBY

Clergyman Peter Norton turned his misfortune into an opportunity to raise money for a charitable cause. Mr. Norton, the vicar of Appleby, slipped and fell after a morning service at St. Lawrence’s Church, injuring his wrist. He had to have a plaster cast put on his arm but made good use of it by gathering signatures together with donations for Rivendell Trust.

KESWICK

Keswick School governors “desperately” need interest free loans from parents to enable plans to move to a single site to go ahead. The scheme hinges on the governors being able to raise £300,000 in just twelve weeks, parents were told at a special meeting. Headmaster Howard Allen told a meeting of parents that failure of the scheme would mean continuance of the “make do and mend” system operated since 1980 at the two-site school and would mean a “very bleak future”.

News of a new manageress taking over at the Keswick Hotel was greeted with some scepticism. The present manageress, Miss Fitzsimmons, will be handing over to another lady … Dusty Binns. Workers at the hotel, part of the Principal Hotels group, at first thought the name was a joke based on the old television program “3 2 1” hosted by Ted Rogers and featuring a dustbin character called Dusty Bin. But the name of their new boss was correct — so they accommodated her in room 321 on a preliminary visit to the hotel.

LONG MARTON

Long Marton School pupils said goodbye to an old friend when dinner lady Elsie Rowlings retired. Mrs. Rowlings worked at the school for a total of nineteen years. At a party, pupils presented her with a Lilliput Lane model of a school. She also received a bouquet and a card signed by pupils.

50 YEARS

CLIFTON

A North Westmorland parson has renewed his protest against a corner on the A.6 following another accident there. An articulated lorry crashed through the wall of Clifton Rectory, four miles south of Penrith — on a corner which at one time claimed thirteen accidents in under a month, according to the Rector, the Rev. T. E. T. Burbury. He alleges that the camber of the road is all wrong and creates nightmares. He said: “We have been fighting to get something done, but the Ministry of Transport say that it is all right.”

PENRITH

A man who is likely to earn the title of the football manager of the year will be back in playing strip and leading a team of former stars on the Penrith Football Club ground. Alan Ashman, who steered Carlisle United from Fourth to Second Divisions in successive seasons and has taken West Bromwich into the final of the F.A. Cup in his first year as manager there, is coming back to Penrith to take part in a charity match arranged by the Rotary Club to raise funds for their project of making a garden in a now-neglected corner of St. Andrew’s Churchyard.

KESWICK

Mrs. Anne Stokstad, Spoony Green Lane, Keswick, who is one of the very few women technical representatives in the electronics industry, has carried off the title of “representative of the year” awarded by one of the divisions of Mullard Ltd., the company for which she works. Mrs. Stockstad, who calls on the radio and television trade in Cumberland, Westmorland and part of Lancashire, became interested in electronics in 1941 when, while serving in the Wrens, she took a course in radio and radar. After the war she worked on radio servicing and was later a project engineer on electronic flight simulators.

100 YEARS

PENRITH

Lance Corporal Gordon Simpson, 11th Hussars, son of Mrs. and the late Mr. H. B. Simpson, Howard Street, has been awarded the D.C.M. Joining the Army in 1914, he has been in France for two years. He had a narrow escape when the Germans advanced in such tremendous numbers that he was forced to fire until his machine gun was red-hot. Before the war he was a well-known member of the cricket club.

What might have been a serious fire broke out in the Beacon. Some of the Canadian Forestry Corps had been engaged in burning the tops of the fir trees when, with a high prevailing wind, part of the wood at the back near Stagstones caught light. Fortunately, the fire was prevented from spreading.