In this week in history 25 YEARS PENRITH

Date: Tuesday 13th February 2018
Members of the Tirril and Sockbridge entertainment group whose pantomime, “Babes in the Wood”, was performed at Tirril Reading Room 25 years ago.
Members of the Tirril and Sockbridge entertainment group whose pantomime, “Babes in the Wood”, was performed at Tirril Reading Room 25 years ago.

Penrith and the Border MP David Maclean and his dog are among the finalists in a competition to find the Westminster dog of the year. Environment minister Mr. Maclean is included in a shortlist of fourteen representatives from both Houses, almost eighty of whom entered the competition, which is in support of the National Canine Defence League.

Penrith and the Border MP David Maclean and his dog are among the finalists in a competition to find the Westminster dog of the year. Environment minister Mr. Maclean is included in a shortlist of fourteen representatives from both Houses, almost eighty of whom entered the competition, which is in support of the National Canine Defence League.

A cash-starved animal charity has managed to save a puppy abandoned in a cardboard box near Penrith. Members of the town branch of Animal Concern were alerted when the abandoned terrier puppy was discovered in a lay-by near Stoneybeck. Now named Holli, the terrier has been found a new home in the town thanks to the efforts of the charity’s volunteers.

If Penrith people wanted the controversial Saturday market there was little traders could do about it, Mr. Frank Wilson, new president of the town’s Chamber of Trade admitted. Speaking at the chamber’s annual dinner at the George Hotel, he said: “If people want a weekly market outside Penrith who are we to deny it to them?”

STAINTON

The two youngest pupils at Stainton Primary School, Kayleigh Lancaster and Christopher Dawson, both aged four, commemorated a school extension by cementing a foundation brick. They were watched by their fellow pupils and school staff at a special ceremony to mark the occasion.

CUMBRIA

The Sports Council and National Rivers Authority have commissioned a study into water sports in the north of England. The nine-month study will assess demand and review provision for a wide variety of water-based activities ranging from established sports such as angling to newer ones like dragonb0at racing and jet skiing.

EDEN

Activities in connection with the designing and fund-raising of a climbing wall in the Eden Valley are now in full swing. A group called the Eden Valley Climbing Wall Project was formed to work in partnership with Eden Council towards the construction of a wall in a specifically constructed building adjacent to Penrith swimming pool.

CROGLIN

A Suffolk ewe has proved that she is something of a “super mum”, after producing her 14th crop of lambs. The ewe is owned by Mrs. June Gibson, of The Croft, Scarrowmanwick, near Croglin, and the latest delivery of twins gave her a total of 33 offspring over the past 14 years.

TIRRIL

A former pig farm near Tirril is to be converted into an equestrian centre. Former broiler houses on the site at Low Close Farm will be demolished. The application to the Lake District Planning Board to change the use of the land was made by Mr. and Mrs. P. Zalkind.

50 YEARS

THORNTHWAITE

The vicar of Thorn-thwaite, near Keswick, the Rev. R. S. Woodall, has won his fight for permission to erect a traffic mirror opposite what he calls the “suicidal exit” from his vicarage drive. The drive opens on to the busy A.594 road scheduled for trunking. “It is impossible to see round the corner and I take my life in my hands every time I drive out,” says Mr. Woodall.

EDEN

A local beat music group decided that work and studies were the first priority when they were offered the opportunity to tour Italy. The chance for the “Burgundy Blues” came through their agents in Carlisle and would probably have entailed spending two weeks abroad. “Some of us are working, two more are studying at Carlisle Art College and others are at school, so it was not really possible for us to consider the offer,” said 17-year-old Graham Luck, who is the group’s lead singer.

KESWICK

The call has gone out to Keswick’s bachelor cricketers to make a big hit — with equally unattached young ladies! And it is all in the cause of the game, said the President of Keswick Cricket Club, Sir Percy M. Hope, at the annual meeting at the Twa Dogs Inn. Sir Percy paid tribute to the ladies’ committee for their sterling work for the club, but added that more members were required to strengthen the existing helpers. “Has nobody got married since last year?” he asked. Urging the club’s unmarried members into action, Sir Percy commented: “Some of you will have to provide us with some more ladies because we want them to help with our cricket.”

100 YEARS

CULGAITH

At an examination held by the Trinity College of Music at Carlisle, Miss Edith Wilkinson obtained honours in the intermediate section of pianoforte playing. She is a pupil of Mr. W. H. Huddart.

NEWTON REIGNY

The Rev. Charles Henry Vidal Gollmer, Rector of Newton Reigny and assistant curate of St. Andrew’s, Penrith, has died in Liverpool following a serious operation, aged 63. Mr. Gollmer, who was educated at the Church Missionary College, Islington, was ordained deacon in 1878 and then priest in 1879, by the Bishop of Sierra Leone.