In this week in history 25 YEARS PENRITH

Date: Monday 22nd January 2018

Penrithian David Farrer returned to the scene of a historic incident, just 25 years ago, when his skills with a bow and arrow earned him a special niche in the history of Eden. Now living in Collory, near Sydney, Australia, 54-year-old Mr. Farrer is revisiting his home town for the first time in 22 years and staying with his mother, Mrs. Edith Farrer, Glasson Court, Penrith. His return has almost coincided with the 25th anniversary of the day in March, 1968, when the old stone bridge over the River Eden at Langwathby was swept away by the worst floods in living memory and he was called in to restore the telephone link between the Penrith exchange and the East Fellside, using his bow and arrow.

Penrithian David Farrer returned to the scene of a historic incident, just 25 years ago, when his skills with a bow and arrow earned him a special niche in the history of Eden. Now living in Collory, near Sydney, Australia, 54-year-old Mr. Farrer is revisiting his home town for the first time in 22 years and staying with his mother, Mrs. Edith Farrer, Glasson Court, Penrith. His return has almost coincided with the 25th anniversary of the day in March, 1968, when the old stone bridge over the River Eden at Langwathby was swept away by the worst floods in living memory and he was called in to restore the telephone link between the Penrith exchange and the East Fellside, using his bow and arrow.

Consumers of lamb would not bear the cost of “green” marketing schemes such as Farm Assurance, sheep farmers were told at the North West and Borders sheep fair. The fair, staged at Penrith’s new mart, was opened by freelance agricultural journalist and broadcaster Robert Forster. Mr. Forster, formerly the northern counties correspondent of the “Farmers’ Guardian”, has gained a reputation as an interpreter of international livestock market trends.

APPLEBY

Appleby residents will be fully consulted before any decision is made about a flood alleviation scheme for the town, Penrith and the Border MP David Maclean said. He was commenting on a letter he had received from the National Rivers Authority which gave the assurance. In the letter from Dr. Chris Harpley, regional general manager, Mr. Maclean was told that the NRA were “very conscious of their responsibility to carry out alleviation work in as sympathetic a way as possible with the least possible effect on the aesthetics of the town”.

KESWICK

As negotiations went on behind the scenes to find a new building contractor, the partially completed St. Kentigern’s School at Keswick was dedicated at a special service on St. Kentigern’s Day. Work on the new building has temporarily stopped because Carlisle-based Eden Construction has gone into receivership, but county council officials are confident that work will be resumed soon and completed by next Spring.

Demands by residents of Crosthwaite Road in Keswick for a reduction in the weight of traffic passing their homes have been dismissed by Cumbria County Council highways officers. The residents had called on Keswick county councillor Mr. Stuart Askew to lobby on their behalf. It had been suggested that weight restrictions could be used.

50 YEARS

ALSTON

A new factory for Alston is on the drawing board and the idea behind it is to provide jobs for the district’s school leavers and to counteract a falling population. Mr. W. G. Ball, chairman and managing director of Precision Products Ltd., Alston, who plan the factory, told the “Herald” that it would provide jobs for between 70 and 80 people. The proposed site is a 3.7 acre field at Potters Lonning and the Cumberland Education Committee was recommended to approve its use for factory development.

KESWICK

A 26-year-old Keswick girl, Miss Elsie White, is to fly out to the Sudan to start work in a mission hospital. Miss White, who lives in Southey Street, has completed a 15-month spell of training at the Church Missionary Society’s training college at Chislehurst, Kent, and will start work as a sister in the 120-bed hospital at Omdurman, Northern Sudan, dealing with leprosy and general nursing.

CUMBERLAND AND WESTMORLAND

In one of the worst gales ever to hit the North of England, wind speeds of up to 134 m.p.h. were registered early at the Board of Trade’s radio station, 2,800ft. up on Great Dun Fell in the Westmorland Pennines. It was the highest speed ever recorded in England and Wales. The gale caused havoc over a wide area of East Cumberland and North Westmorland. In Fell Lane, Penrith, a chimney weighing about twenty tonnes collapsed and crashed through the roof of Brent Cottage, trapping the occupant of the top flat, 76-year-old Miss May Stringer, in her bedroom. Miss Stringer had to be rescued by the police who climbed through an upstairs window.

CUMBERLAND

Border Television announcer Mary Winters has had thousands of viewers asking themselves the same question ever since she started appearing on the screen five months ago. “I wonder what her hair is really like?” has been the poser. For the style and colour of 19-year-old Mary’s hair has been changing almost as quickly as the weather. Viewers soon decided that it was all done with attractive wigs, but not many could work out which was the real Mary Winters. In fact, the answer is that Mary’s natural crowning glory is long and blonde. Appearing regularly on the television screen means that a woman must take particular care with her hair, so Mary hit the idea of wigs as being much more convenient.

100 YEARS

PENRITH

New regulations for the sale of sheep have now come out, but because they did not receive sufficient publicity, some confusion resulted. At the mart many farmers were unaware of the new regulations. There was a great element of uncertainty, and many flockmasters drove their sheep back home.

BROUGH

Mr. John Hodgson, rural postman, who travels 14 miles a day from Brough to Crosby Garret, has had presented to him the sum of £23 as a token of the respect held for him by the numerous friends he has made in his work.