In this week in history 25 YEARS PENRITH

Date: Tuesday 6th February 2018
Pupils of class three at Lazonby School who held a coffee and tea afternoon in aid of the Shetland emergency appeal 25 years ago.
Pupils of class three at Lazonby School who held a coffee and tea afternoon in aid of the Shetland emergency appeal 25 years ago.

A 130-year-old Cumbrian success story ended with news of the closure of Redmayne’s plastics factory and the loss of 48 Penrith jobs. The combined effects of the recession and an influx of cheap foreign imports have been blamed for the shut-down. Concern over the future of the Gilwilly-based factory had grown, with a continued fall-off in orders from high street retailers, and an executive from the parent company, Allied Textiles, came to Penrith to break the news.

A 130-year-old Cumbrian success story ended with news of the closure of Redmayne’s plastics factory and the loss of 48 Penrith jobs. The combined effects of the recession and an influx of cheap foreign imports have been blamed for the shut-down. Concern over the future of the Gilwilly-based factory had grown, with a continued fall-off in orders from high street retailers, and an executive from the parent company, Allied Textiles, came to Penrith to break the news.

THORNTHWAITE

An ancient landmark at Thornthwaite has been destroyed by the storms. A 200-year-old monkey puzzle tree, which featured on a local postcard, was blown down in high winds. The tree was in the garden of Mrs. Karen Lockwood, Powter House, who said it was well known in the area.

LAKELAND

Financially hard pressed Lakeland hill farmers are being pushed into a situation where they will have to consider charging people for access to their land. The prediction came from Keswick area farmer Richard Allen as he joined a mass march by hill farmers on Whitehall to protest over a 26 per cent. cut in government support. The hill men say that they and their families are facing rising costs and slashed incomes as a result of the decision to cut Hill Livestock Compensatory Allowance, a payment aimed at encouraging farmers to continue to live and work in upland areas.

KESWICK

A Keswick councillor has suggested pledging £100,000 from council finances to the fund to build a new theatre in Keswick. Mr. Paul Buttle proposed that the council pledge the money from the Town Project Reserve, a council fund with over £100,000 in it which has been set aside to pay for a project for the benefit of the whole town.

EDEN

When retirement loomed, Eden pensioner Fred Dent decided to apply his mind to things of a more academic nature. Having left his village school at the age of 14, retired farmer Mr. Dent, of Greengill, Morland, took up the challenge of an Open University degree when he turned 65. Aged 72, he was delighted to be among several hundred new Open University graduates in the North.

PENRITH

A member of Penrith Chamber of Trade slammed a Lake District pressure group’s opposition to the multi-million pound holiday complex plan for Whinfell forest. Mr. Harry Richardson, speaking at the chamber’s annual meeting, said the proposal, if it received planning permission from Eden Council, would bring a tourism boost to the town and create badly needed jobs. Mr. Ian Proud said he doubted whether the holiday complex would greatly boost the economy and businesses in the town since it appeared to be self-contained, but he agreed job opportunities were “great”.

50 YEARS

PENRITH

“A golden opportunity” exists for Penrith in greater income from tourism, said the director of the new English Lakes Counties Travel Association, Mr. L. H. Langley. Mr. Langley, making his first speech in the town at the annual dinner of the Chamber of Trade in the George Hotel, said: “By raising your sights to further development you have a golden opportunity to put Penrith on the map by providing expanded entertainment and conference facilities.”

Highlights of the Penrith Rural District Council’s dinner at the Edenhall Hotel was a double presentation to Mr. Albert N. Rushforth who the preceding evening retired from the posts of Deputy Clerk and Deputy Financial Officer to the Council.

There was a memorable day for Mrs. Lizzie Jane Pickering, Castle Terrace, when she celebrated her 90th birthday. A native of Penrith, Mrs. Pickering has lived in the town all her life and has seen many changes. Her father, Mr. George Bell, was a tinsmith and kept an ironmonger’s shop in Angel Lane, which is now a fish and chip shop.

APPLEBY

“The flowers that bloom in spring, tra la,” says the song, but a white hydrangea grown by Mrs. Mary Vaughan, Brampton Croft Ends, Appleby, prefers to bloom in mid-winter. Hydrangeas usually do not flower until the summer and, even then, white blooms are rare. This plant has been flowering since mid-December and has not finished yet.

100 YEARS

PENRITH

Mr. John Maynard, a Crimean War veteran, has died at the age of 82 at the home of his eldest son in Preston. He served with the East Middlesex Regiment in the Crimea, and was present at the siege of Sevastopol.

Mr. F. Dudson, Stricklandgate, has had his marine warehouse gutted by a night fire. Some Canadian soldiers who were at a dance at the Drill Hall were among the first to arrive at the scene, and they assisted by moving the furniture from nearby cottages. Over 100 sheep skins and 10cwt. of wool in the warehouse were destroyed, but fortunately the fire did not spread to the cottages.

NENTHEAD

The Soldiers Recognition and Welcome Home Association held another public meeting to pay tribute to four local soldiers — Privates William Stout, Harrison Walton, Archibald Johnston and Harry Stout.