In this week in history 25 YEARS PENRITH

Date: Monday 13th November 2017

Hundreds of fake goods, including watches, cassettes and video tapes, were well and truly destroyed when a roller crushed the counterfeit items at Cumbria County Council’s highways depot at Skirsgill, Penrith. The exercise, by the county council’s trading standards department, was part of national consumer week with the scheme “Fair’s fair”.

Hundreds of fake goods, including watches, cassettes and video tapes, were well and truly destroyed when a roller crushed the counterfeit items at Cumbria County Council’s highways depot at Skirsgill, Penrith. The exercise, by the county council’s trading standards department, was part of national consumer week with the scheme “Fair’s fair”.

The 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month has a meaning far deeper than just a simple date — and for Penrith youngster Helen Castle the time is extra special because it is the exact moment of her birth. This year it was all the elevens for Helen because she celebrated her 11th birthday. Helen, who lives at Scaws Drive, is the daughter of Chris and Val Castle.

EDEN

An Eden priest is reconsidering his future within the Carlisle diocese and the Church of England following the controversial General Synod vote to admit women to the priesthood. The Rev. Ralph Beaumont, Melmerby, has long opposed the ordination of women as being against scripture and tradition. “It strikes at the whole idea of the ministerial priesthood,” he told the “Herald”.

Jobless figures within Eden are showing “disturbing trends” it has been claimed. The council’s economic development officer, Mr. Don Taylor, said there were signs of significant increases in the number of people out of work in one or two wards within the district, particularly areas like Askham, Kirkby Stephen, Langwathby and Ravenstonedale, where the jobless rate has doubled.

GLENRIDDING

Cumbria Tourist Board, the Lake District National Park Authority and Patterdale School jointly celebrated the new unified Europe. As part of the Beacon Europe celebrations to mark the opening of the single European market, the tourist board and the national park authority organised the planting of a circle of twelve trees in Glenridding, to represent the twelve EC member states.

ALSTON

Alston Moor parish councillors heard the content of a letter from MP David Maclean in reply to their complaint relating to the proposed closure of the refuse tip at Alston. His letter explained that the Environmental Protection Act 1990 has required waste disposal authorities to award waste disposal contracts through competitive tendering. The introduction of competition should help to keep down costs — to the benefit of the local chargepayer — when the general desire for higher standard tended to increase them. However, a successful tender would not necessarily choose to use the existing council waste disposal site in a particular area.

PENRITH

Dozens of cards from family, friends and neighbours and a telegram of congratulations from the Queen have helped Penrith couple John and Annie Dalton to celebrate their diamond wedding anniversary. The couple, of Inglewood Road, are both natives of the town. They married at Penrith Register Office on the 14th November, 1932, and Mr. Dalton worked for Norweb for many years until retirement.

50 YEARS

PENRITH

A Penrith couple received a surprise telephone call from their 21-year-old son, over 3,000 miles away in sunny Bermuda. Esme Newsham, son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Newsham, Corn Market, Penrith, made the call to say he would be home later in the month after working for a year as a chef on an ocean-going liner. Esme was also able to extend birthday greetings to his father whose birthday was the next day. “The call was a complete surprise and it was just like speaking to somebody in the same room,” said Mrs. Newsham.

“Exciting and momentous developments” face Ullswater Secondary Modern School at Penrith, said the Headmaster, Mr. J. C. Kirlew, at the school speech day. Mr. Kirlew said extensive additions to the school and the adjoining Tynefield Girls’ School were planned to be ready by the Autumn of 1970 and the same year would see the raising of the school leaving age to 16. The new buildings would incorporate new ideas of accommodation and facilities which would provide a greater range of creative opportunities to find and develop whatever abilities pupils had.

APPLEBY

Complaints from guests at an Appleby hotel are not going to silence the night-time chiming of the church clock. Every quarter of an hour the chimes of the clock of St. Lawrence’s Church will ring out, the Borough Council decided at their meeting. And customers at the Tufton Arms Hotel will have to suffer the noise as they try to get to sleep, said the hotel’s owner, Captain Ernest Bennison, when he heard the Council’s decision on the complaint he had made.

100 YEARS

PENRITH

There was a shortage of butter at Penrith market. Many wholesale buyers were present, but farmers’ wives were careful to see that their regular customers were supplied.

LITTLE SALKELD

Ever since the war began the Little Salkeld farmers — to their credit, be it said — have sold milk to all the inhabitants at the pre-war price of 3d. per quart, while all the farmers in other villages jumped the price up to 4d. The Little Salkeld farmers still seem to survive and look very prosperous.