In this week in history 25 YEARS PENRITH

Date: Tuesday 11th July 2017
Cheering on Appleby carnival 25 years ago are members of Appleby brownies.
Cheering on Appleby carnival 25 years ago are members of Appleby brownies.

Traffic dangers in Penrith’s Castle Drive are to be investigated by Cumbria County Council after residents renewed their road safety protest in the wake of three serious crashes. The announcement came only days after the latest incident, in which a car skidded from the highway, landed on its side in a low-level footpath and came to rest on a hedge, only feet from a family’s living room window. The accident was the third in a matter of a week and it gave worried residents a new determination to renew their call for road safety measures.

Traffic dangers in Penrith’s Castle Drive are to be investigated by Cumbria County Council after residents renewed their road safety protest in the wake of three serious crashes. The announcement came only days after the latest incident, in which a car skidded from the highway, landed on its side in a low-level footpath and came to rest on a hedge, only feet from a family’s living room window. The accident was the third in a matter of a week and it gave worried residents a new determination to renew their call for road safety measures.

GREAT ASBY

An unexploded mortar bomb was found on Orton Scar by sharp-eyed fell walker Mr. Alan Cable. The 4ins. smoke bomb was discovered near the cattle grid at the top of Orton Scar by 28-year-old Mr. Cable, who is a frequent visitor to Great Asby.

NENTHEAD

Nenthead Football Club’s annual dinner and presentation night was held at Greenhead Hotel. The season was reviewed by secretary Ronald Watson who said Nenthead had repeated their success of the previous year, finishing runners-up to Morton in the Carlisle and District Sunday League.

ORTON

Orton parish councillors were pleased with the draft report on alterations to the route of the Pennine Bridleway. In view of the worries expressed by a number of people regarding the problems which could be caused by the bridleway going near Sunbiggin Tarn, to the detriment of plants and wildlife, the new proposal will miss the area altogether and pass through only the fringes of the parish.

KESWICK

A Fell pony owned by a Keswick farmer has gained top awards at a major agricultural show. Five year-old Carrock Polly-Anna, won the in-hand native pony championship at the Cumbria and Northern Counties show at Carnforth for the Cockbain family. She also took the reserve in-hand championship.

APPLEBY

Appleby carnival — this year based on a Wild West theme — went off with a real bang. Despite an overcast day, crowds turned out in large numbers. Town crier Bill Coates got everybody in the carnival spirit in the morning and proceedings got underway with the crowning of carnival queen Tina Jennings and rose queen Laura Kripp.

EDEN

Eden Council will contribute £10,000 over two years towards the cost of building a lead mining heritage centre at Nenthead. Chief planning officer Mr. Graham Allan recommended that the Economic Development Sub-Committee contribute £5,000 towards the project and the Tourism Sub-Committee a further £5,000 since the development would create jobs for the district and attract tourists.

50 YEARS

CUMBERLAND

Last on view when the Royal Show was held in Newcastle in 1962, Herdwick sheep made a reappearance at the Royal at Stoneleigh, Warwickshire. There were only two classes. Among the rams on view was Mr. John Richardson’s (Swinside) shearling of his own breeding which won the Edmondson cup at the Keswick May Fair.

GLASSONBY

Appointed Chief Constable of Worcester and Droitwich is the Deputy Chief, Mr. Joseph R. Davidson, who is a native of the East Cumberland Fellside.

PENRITH

Seventeen boys and girls from Penrith Queen Elizabeth Grammar School leave Penrith for an unusual holiday on the Continent. In charge of two members of the staff, Mr. Ron Shimmin and the Senior Mistress, Mrs. M. Hulton, they are to travel in their own bus and stay at camping sites in various parts of Germany.

Two-months-old Lorna Christina Kerr is the first baby to have been born on the new Beacon View caravan site in Newton Road, Penrith, where members of the staff of Sir Alfred McAlpine are living during the construction of the motorway. The baby was born at the County Maternity Home just across the road from her parents’ mobile home. She is the first child for 24-year-old civil engineer, Mr. James Kerr, and his 22-year-old wife, Margaret.

KIRKBY STEPHEN

Mr. Joseph Thomas Savage, Kirbanks, Rowgate, Kirkby Stephen, a well-known resident of the town, reaches his 90th birthday today. He is the son of Mr. Thomas Savage, Winton, who was a joiner and founder of the well-known firm of Thomas Savage and Sons of the Sawmills, Kirkby Stephen.

CUMBERLAND AND WESTMORLAND

A “Herald” reader, Mr. J. T. Relph, Holly Cottage, Crosby Ravensworth, has sent the following extract from the “Kirkby Stephen and Appleby Messenger” of April, 1891. “Absolute silence has hitherto been maintained in the weekly press of the district as to an important development of newspaper enterprise. The ably conducted but too small ‘Penrith Herald’ has grown beyond the power of its proprietor, Mr. Hodgson, to cope with and has been bought by a Company of the leading Liberals of Mid Cumberland and North Westmorland. Good business premises have been secured and are being fit up for the reception of new machinery, etc.”

100 YEARS

CROGLIN

Lieutenant R. S. Newton, M.C., son of the Rev. A. S. Newton, Rector of Croglin, is among those “mentioned for gallant and distinguished conduct in the field” by General Sir Archibald Murray, in his dispatch relating to operations in the Sinai desert.

CALDBECK

The caterpillar plague, which began in the Peak District and has infected the Westmorland hills in the Mallerstang and other districts, has now invaded the Caldbeck Fells and hills in the Threlkeld district, where hundreds of acres are affected.