In this week in history 25 YEARS PENRITH

Date: Monday 8th May 2017
Members of the Conservative Club float who were dressed as mermaids at Penrith’s May Day 25 years ago.
Members of the Conservative Club float who were dressed as mermaids at Penrith’s May Day 25 years ago.

When Bonnie Prince Charlie arrived in Penrith in November, 1745, to take up quarters in Devonshire Street he must surely have noticed a drapers’ shop just across the road, though whether he popped in to buy a pair of hose will never be known. The distinctive shop of N. Arnison and Sons had already been established for three years when the Young Pretender came to Penrith, although at that time the shop was trading under a different name. This year the business is celebrating its 250th anniversary.

When Bonnie Prince Charlie arrived in Penrith in November, 1745, to take up quarters in Devonshire Street he must surely have noticed a drapers’ shop just across the road, though whether he popped in to buy a pair of hose will never be known. The distinctive shop of N. Arnison and Sons had already been established for three years when the Young Pretender came to Penrith, although at that time the shop was trading under a different name. This year the business is celebrating its 250th anniversary.

Penrith traders are set to scrap traditional Wednesday half-day closing in a bid to make the town more attractive to tourists. Members of the town’s Chamber of Trade agreed that a concerted effort be made to encourage a welcome in Penrith six days a week. President Mrs. Cherry Stamper introduced the topic and Mrs. Julie Prior, junior vice-president, proposed an open all-day policy.

Henry Howard, the 98-year-old man who played the mouth organ for fellow customers in a Penrith barber’s shop, died suddenly, just two months short of his 99th birthday. Mr. Howard was well-known in the town as a cheerful, outgoing man and an interesting conversationalist.

GLENRIDDING

Eden has been selected to host two prestigious celebrations as part of the unique European Arts Festival. The eyes of Europe will be on Jenkins Field, Glenridding, when the picturesque Lakeland site is transformed for a major international event.

NEWBIGGIN-ON-LUNE

Some people might remember 1963 as the year of President Kennedy’s assassination, the Great Train Robbery and Beatlemania. However, it was also the year that Mrs. Mary Richardson took over the role of chairman of Newbiggin-on-Lune public hall committee. At this year’s annual meeting, members were very sorry to learn of her decision to retire.

KESWICK

A plan to weatherproof the windows of St. John’s Church at Keswick is worrying Lake District planners who want to find out more about the scheme. The church applied to the Lake District Planning Board to be allowed to place polycarbonate sheets over the leaded windows. However, the planners were concerned about the impact the glazing would have on the Grade B “listed” building.

A referendum is to be held in Keswick on Allerdale District Council’s proposal to set up a Thursday outdoor market in addition to the existing Saturday market. The unusual move was made at the annual Town Assembly at the suggestion of town councillor Mr. Paul Buttle who made use of a little known piece of local government law.

50 YEARS

KIRKBY STEPHEN

The coldest May night for years caused a setback to fruit growing in Cumberland and Westmorland. At the Cumberland and Westmorland College of Agriculture and Forestry, Penrith — where 15 degrees of ground frost were registered — a spokesman said: “It is the worst May frost we have had for many years and plums, apples, gooseberries, blackcurrants and the like have suffered considerably.”

CLIFTON

One of the main centres of interest for Penrith and district people was at Clifton, where British engineering history was being made. Several hundred sightseers came and went as a 3,000 ton bridge, designed to carry the London-Glasgow railway line over the Penrith by-pass section of the M.6 motorway, was inched into position in the biggest operation of its kind ever attempted in the British Isles.

WARCOP

Clearing out a cupboard in the North Westmorland Rural Council Offices at Kirkby Stephen, Mr. D. Calvert, the Health Inspector, found a roll of papers which had been unopened for 30 years. The papers turned out to be the original Sandford award, which consists of six sheets of 30 inches by 30 inches closely covered with hand-written details of common, waste and stinted pastures.

PENRITH

A young man arrived in Penrith after travelling half-way round the world on a sentimental journey. Clive Holmes, aged 25, lives in Palmerston, on the North Island of New Zealand, and had heard many stories of Penrith from his late father, Mr. Billy Holmes, who emigrated from the town fifty years ago, when only a young man. Clive learned he had a host of relatives in Penrith and also a unique link with the “Herald” where his grandfather and father had worked and where an uncle and cousin are at present employed.

WATERMILLOCK

A 1,135-mile journey by car from St. Louis, Illinois, to Alamogordo, New Mexico, is described by Chief Petty Officer Christopher Brooks in a letter to his mother, Mrs. J. G. Brooks, Yottenfews, Watermillock. Chief Petty Officer Brooks is in America in connection with his work as an armourer for the testing of aeroplanes.

100 YEARS

GREAT SALKELD

Mr. Heywood Thompson, Nunwick Hall, who a few years ago built a village hall and a reading room for the villagers, has now executed a deed of conveyance to five trustees securing the whole of the buildings to the perpetual use of the inhabitants.

PENRITH

Miss S. D. Elliott, Broug- ham Street, a teacher at the Boys’ Council School, has died. She began her career nearly 24 years ago under Mr. Bolton at the Board School in Castlegate. In 1894 she was transferred to the Brunswick Road School and subsequently to the Council School. Miss Elliott was responsible for the choirs of the Brunswick Road School becoming famous in local circles, and led them to win four challenge shields outright.