In this week in history 25 YEARS PENRITH

Date: Tuesday 4th April 2017
Pupils of Kirkby Thore School made wooden bird models with artist in residence Bob Enthwistle 25 years ago. Left to right are Barry Sowerby, Lorelei Pescodi, Karl Richardson, Rachelle Sananes, Tanya Tutty, Catriona Soulsby and Jane Soulsby.
Pupils of Kirkby Thore School made wooden bird models with artist in residence Bob Enthwistle 25 years ago. Left to right are Barry Sowerby, Lorelei Pescodi, Karl Richardson, Rachelle Sananes, Tanya Tutty, Catriona Soulsby and Jane Soulsby.

Plans for a £200,000 all-weather sporting facility in Penrith have been revealed. A new and independent trust is to be launched to direct the construction of a floodlit synthetic turf pitch to provide a first class playing surface for all manner of sports, including hockey, tennis, soccer and netball.

Plans for a £200,000 all-weather sporting facility in Penrith have been revealed. A new and independent trust is to be launched to direct the construction of a floodlit synthetic turf pitch to provide a first class playing surface for all manner of sports, including hockey, tennis, soccer and netball.

EDEN

Eden councillors completed their business in a record-breaking eleven minutes, including setting the council’s borrowing limits for 1992-93. Treasurer Mr. Allan Ellison told the full council meeting: “This is the annual setting of the council’s borrowing limits as regulated under the Local Government Act.” Councillors approved an overall borrowing limit of £34.7 million and a short-term borrowing limit of £16.6 million.

KESWICK

A Keswick pilot has given his flying career a new lift by building his own microlight aircraft. After flying many types of aircraft Mr. John Houldershaw, Underskiddaw, decided he wanted more of a challenge and looked for an aircraft he could build himself from a kit.

There was a call for an amnesty for properties in Keswick where uPVC windows have been installed without planning permission, one involving a private house. After a fraught and at times emotional meeting, it was decided to take enforcement action to have the windows removed from just two of the properties and to allow them to remain in the other five.

GREYSTOKE

Greystoke trainer Gordon Richard’s hopes of winning a third Grand National were given a boost in the shape of a 33-1 winner at Liverpool. The top-weighted Twin Oaks, with stable jockey Neale Doughty aboard, is the only Greystoke runner in the upcoming race and both trainer and jockey are hopeful of the second favourite, generally priced at around 8-1, adding to their splendid personal achievements in the world’s greatest steeplechase.

KIRKBY STEPHEN

Responsibility for Kirkby Stephen tourist information centre was officially handed over to Eden Council. The ceremony marked the completion of months of work and a change in the running of the centre. Mr. Barry Stacey, aged 45, is continuing as tourist information officer, with the added assistance of part-timers Mrs. Hilary Claxton and Mrs. Joan Bloomfield. The centre will now be open seven days a week from April to October.

APPLEBY

Followers of fashion were treated to a catwalk extravaganza which raised £634 towards Appleby’s new swimming pool. The event was held at the town’s public hall and the audience were entertained by the eloquence of compere Alan Atkinson.

50 YEARS

APPLEBY

What originated literally as a “sinking feeling” for the chef of the centuries-old Appleby Castle may lead to some interesting information coming to light about the building’s history. After he had moved clear, investigations revealed that beneath layed a square-shaped well, over 16ft. deep. Now, the owners of the castle, Mr. and Mrs. John Coney, are calling in experts on ancient monuments and buildings to try to ascertain the age of the well and anything further about it.

Four Boy Scouts were feared lost on the Pennines during a walk from Alston over Cross Fell to Knock, near Appleby. As part of the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Scheme, the four — three aged 16 and the other aged 17 — were to have navigated the fell route and met their Scoutmaster, a 22-year-old medical student, Mr. Donald Shelley, at Knock. By early evening there was no sign of the boys, all from the Cambridge area, and Appleby police were alerted. They were then traced to Garrigill. “They had apparently turned back because of the weather conditions, but we found them before any search teams were called out,” said a police spokesman.

ULLSWATER

The Sharrow Bay Hotel on Ullswater has achieved the distinction of appearing in two leading guides to British hotels and restaurants as having a standard of cuisine which places it among the best restaurants in the country. In November the Egon Ronay guide to hotels and restaurants listed Sharrow Bay as being among the top 35 hotels in the country as far as quality of food was concerned.

PENRITH

The worlds of Penrith’s old and young may be brought closer together by a new idea of the Old People’s Welfare Council. If enough pensioners are interested it is proposed to form a “social high tea club” which will meet once a week. Catering and serving will be done by girls of Tynefield School.

100 YEARS

PENRITH

To mark his retirement from the London and North Western Railway, Inspector Thelwell received an electroplated tea service and inscribed oak tray from Mr. Thurston, the divisional engineer. Inspector Thelwell has served in the area for 30 years.

PENRITH AND SHAP

The number of eggs received for the wounded during March by Mr. William Fleming at Penrith and Shap totalled 2,724. Of these, 1,164 were sent to local hospitals and 1,560 sent to London for use in base hospitals.

APPLEBY

The town is extending its hospitality to wounded soldiers. When the authorities decided that wounded could be transferred to Appleby, Lord Hothfield offered Red House, which has been converted into a very comfortable hospital, with accommodation for twenty patients. The wards are called after the great military and naval leaders and beds are being called after people and parishes contribute £20.