In this week in history 25 YEARS PATTERDALE

Date: Tuesday 9th October 2018

A scheme to provide a new meeting room on the north side of St. Patrick’s Church, Patterdale, has been rejected by planners. One member of the Lake District Planning Board’s development control committee described the proposals as “criminal” for the way they would spoil the overall appearance of the church. Members visited the church to see how great the impact of the new extension would be.

A scheme to provide a new meeting room on the north side of St. Patrick’s Church, Patterdale, has been rejected by planners. One member of the Lake District Planning Board’s development control committee described the proposals as “criminal” for the way they would spoil the overall appearance of the church. Members visited the church to see how great the impact of the new extension would be.

PENRITH

Elderly patients at Penrith New Hospital have been asked to find alternative places at private nursing homes because a change in policy means the number of long-stay geriatric beds at the hospital has been cut. Relatives who met with administrators to lodge their objections were told the change is all part of the Government’s “care in the community” policy for health care.

One hundred years ago, Penrithians raised £3,000 to provide a much-needed public venue for entertainment and meetings — the Drill Hall. Since its loss in the 1960s there has been something of a gaping hole in the facilities for major arts and entertainment promotions in the town, making Eden one of the few local authority centres in the country without any public theatre or arts centre. A public meeting is to be held in the ballroom at the George Hotel, Penrith, to discuss possible options to improve the situation.

Penrith Rugby Club is the likely venue for the town’s first organised fireworks display for many years. The event is being organised together with Penrith Round Table. It will be strictly managed and there will be sideshows and entertainment.

KESWICK

A call has been made for the people of Keswick to break their links with West Cumbria and join Eden district. Former Keswick mayor Eric Impey, who also taught at a Penrith school, first led a campaign for Keswick to be moved from Allerdale to Eden in 1985. There was a favourable response at the time, but Keswick Town Council were unable to afford a detailed study of the financial implications.

PENRITH/KESWICK

Concerns about how planned improvements to the A66 between Penrith and Keswick would affect the Lake District National Park have been dismissed by the Department of Transport. Plans include the provision of “climbing lanes” for slow-moving traffic on some steep hills in order to avoid long traffic queues forming. However, the Lake District National Park Authority argued that the road should be left as it is and no further changes made to the section in the national park.

KIRKBY STEPHEN

Farmer Nelson Robinson had quite a surprise when he inspected his flock of Swaledales at Trainriggs Farm, Kirkby Stephen. For instead of counting sixty sheep, he was astonished to notice there were sixty-two. On closer inspection it turned out a five-shear ewe had given birth to twins — an unusual event so late in the year.

50 YEARS

PENRITH

Some pretty funny things happen when the Basil Brush show is on the B.B.C. television screen — but one of his recent programs produced bewildering happenings which were confined to a Penrith house. The program invited an expert to talk to children on coins, such as pennies which through being minted in certain years in restricted numbers now carry a rarity value. Philip Doak, aged eight, and his brother Michael, aged six, were so enthralled as they watched the program in their Clifford Road home that they insisted on their father turning out his pockets. Mr. Andy Doak, a 36-year-old mechanic employed by the G.P.O., duly examined the pennies from his pocket. Mr. Doak said: “I could not believe my eyes.” For while he searched for old coins, he found one from the future — a penny clearly dated 1986. The coin, which bears the head of George V on the reverse side, seems to have been cunningly altered so that the three is now an eight.

Magistrates at Penrith spend many hours listening to motoring cases and it is generally a pretty humdrum and monotonous task. There was a humorous interlude for one of the defendants sent in his plea in verse form: “In these few lines I would convey, the deep reproach I feel today, that after 20 years at large, on British roads, without a charge, I have to recognise the fact, I’ve contravened the Traffic Act.” With the notice of fine and the defendant’s endorsed licence, the clerk sent this: “The postman brought your rhyming plea, which duly was read out by me, the court enjoyed the verse, but six pounds fine the magistrates did fix. Your licence too I have endorsed, a punishment the Act has enforced, to be imposed on all who speed, excepting cases of rare need. Your licence now I reconsign and await the payment of the fine.”

KIRKBY STEPHEN

Workmen demolishing old property in the centre of Kirkby Stephen removed a heavy stone slab from the ground in front of one of the buildings and discovered a system of tunnels hewn out of solid rock and running for a considerable distance underground.

100 YEARS

PENRITH

A journalist who has been spending a brief holiday in the town wrote his impression: “Penrith is the most queerly built town I have ever been in. I only came across three straight streets. I could not find any public parks, but if three flower beds, three seats and a grass plot or two constitute a park, there is a good imitation of one in front of the Town Hall … Penrith is a very nice quiet country town, very clean, but very dull.”