In this week in history 25 YEARS LAITHES

Date: Tuesday 31st October 2017

Alan Noble will be celebrating as enthusiastically as any American Democrat if Bill Clinton makes it to the White House in the presidential election in the USA — for the 21-year-old Eden student will have helped put him there. Ian, son of Reg and Annette Noble, Town End Cottage, Laithes, spent a month at the Democratic Party’s national headquarters at Little Rock, Arkansas, working with Clinton’s election campaign team.

Alan Noble will be celebrating as enthusiastically as any American Democrat if Bill Clinton makes it to the White House in the presidential election in the USA — for the 21-year-old Eden student will have helped put him there. Ian, son of Reg and Annette Noble, Town End Cottage, Laithes, spent a month at the Democratic Party’s national headquarters at Little Rock, Arkansas, working with Clinton’s election campaign team.

ALSTON

Alston youngsters were delighted by an unplanned and unexpected holiday attraction which literally dropped from the sky. The spectacle, which attracted hundreds of school children, passing motorists and curious residents, was an RAF Chinook helicopter which had to make an emergency landing in a field just outside of the town. The helicopter was involved in an evasion exercise with an RAF fighter jet when instruments registered a fault with one of the chopper’s five gear boxes.

KESWICK

A Keswick chef has been judged one of the top twelve in the North West. “Town and Country” magazine organised a competition to find the best chefs in the region and recently announced the results at an eight-course banquet at the Mansion House in Tatton Park, Cheshire — cooked by the 12 winners.

Among them was Robert Thornton, executive chef at the Underscar Manor, near Keswick. His achievement was all the more remarkable since the Underscar has only been open for just over a year.

PENRITH

Miniature cottage makers Lilliput Lane are drinking to the success of one of their latest pieces based on an historic Kendal building. The Penrith company sculpted an intricate model of the 17th Century Chocolate House in Branthwaite Brow, Kendal, where owner Joy Moore runs a popular chocolate drinks business.

Former England cricket captain David Gower bowled over an invited audience when he visited a Penrith beauty salon. Gower, controversially omitted from the England party to tour India, was in sparking form at a champagne party to mark the fifth anniversary of the opening of the Brockles salon.

50 YEARS

APPLEBY

The appeal launched in aid of the heating of the Appleby Swimming Pool has brought in upwards of £1,600. At a meeting of the committee it was agreed that an oil-fired heating plant should be installed at a cost of £2,285, the contract being given to Messrs. Morphet Ltd., Leeds.

KESWICK

Mrs. Molly Straughan, Manor Brow, Keswick, flew to India where she is to join her daughter and son-in-law. It is, in fact, her second visit to India, for she was there about ten years ago. On this occasion, Mrs. Straughan expects to be away for three months.

CUMBERLAND AND WESTMORLAND

Precautions against the spread of foot-and-mouth disease have dominated farming throughout Cumberland and Westmorland during the past week. Forty-four cases have occurred in the Shropshire area, and what caused special precautions further north was an outbreak confirmed at Carnforth.

KIRKBY STEPHEN

A former Penrithian, Mr. J. Alan Ritchie, has been appointed manager of Kirkby Stephen branch of Martins Bank, in succession to Mr. John A. Henderson, who has been promoted to the management of Appleby branch.

PENRITH

A member of Penrith Urban Council challenged the Council to hold a public referendum to get views on the proposal for an inner ring road. Mr. Geoffrey Johnston was commenting on minutes of the Planning Committee who had recommended that the Council should re-affirm their decision to adopt in principle the central area advisory plan and proposals for the inner ring road. Mr. Johnston — one of only two members who opposed the recommendation in committee — said he was very disappointed that the Planning Committee had put this to the Council, especially in view if the fact that the proposed width was 60ft.

A four-month holiday in Tasmania and New Zealand with former Penrith and district people is in store for Mrs. Elsie M. Proctor, Alandale, Beacon Edge. Mrs. Proctor, a secretary with the Penrith Farmers’ and Kidd’s Auction Company, sails from Tilbury, bound for Launceston.

100 YEARS

SHAP

Mr. Richardson Cowin, Brookfield, has died aged 85. At the old Hackthorpe Grammar School, he was a schoolfellow of the Bishop of Hereford, Dr. Percival, and used to say of him: “Jack Percival was ower thrang wi’ his studyin’, an he wadn’t laik.” For 53 years Mr. Cowin was tenant of Brownhowe Farm, Melkinthorpe, and then took Castlehowe Scar, Shap. For a time he represented Clifton on the West Ward Board of Guardians.

KIRKBY STEPHEN

A goods train, travelling from the direction of Stainmore Summit, had brake failure and ran at terrific speed with both whistles being blown continuously. Fortunately, the train kept to the metals and was given a clear run through on to the Tebay line where a rising gradient halted the runaway.

PENRITH

Friends of Joe Massey, who before the 1914-18 war was a professional for the Penrith Cricket Club, learnt of his successful season with the willow in Lancashire. He headed the batting averages in the Bolton League. Playing for Farnworth, he had 19 innings, was five times not out and totalled 607 runs at an average of 43.35.