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In this week in history 25 YEARS KIRKBY THORE

Date: Tuesday 7th March 2017
Famous trumpeteer Crispian Steele-Perkins entertains members of Eden Children’s Concert Club at Langwathby School 25 years ago.
Famous trumpeteer Crispian Steele-Perkins entertains members of Eden Children’s Concert Club at Langwathby School 25 years ago.

Six pupils of Kirkby Thore Primary School were bang on target in a nationwide competition to design a football magazine. Teams of children between the ages of seven and 11 were invited to write and design their own magazine in the contest run jointly by “Match”, the football magazine, and Children’s Channel. The judges were looking for creativity and originality and hundreds of entries were received from all over the country. There was great delight when the news came through that six Kirkby Thore pupils had won the £1,000 first prize.

Six pupils of Kirkby Thore Primary School were bang on target in a nationwide competition to design a football magazine. Teams of children between the ages of seven and 11 were invited to write and design their own magazine in the contest run jointly by “Match”, the football magazine, and Children’s Channel. The judges were looking for creativity and originality and hundreds of entries were received from all over the country. There was great delight when the news came through that six Kirkby Thore pupils had won the £1,000 first prize.

KESWICK

The Keswick Carnival Queen in June will be Emma Eastoe. Ten-year-old Emma will be the star of the carnival parade through Keswick and will represent the town at other carnivals in Cumbria.

A crackdown on allegedly unauthorised plastic windows at Keswick could cost the property owners involved thousands of pounds. A survey has identified a list of buildings where uPVC windows have been installed without planning

permission. Action to have them removed is likely to be taken in the cases of seven properties and more cases are in the pipeline.

PENRITH

Fluffy the cat never ceases to amaze owner Mrs. June Sewell, a Penrith shopkeeper, with its keen sense of direction. Virtually every day, come rain, hail or snow, the black and white male earnestly treks across the town from its new home to the old one in Castlegate. Mrs. Sewell lived above her wool shop, “Bo-peep” for fourteen years, but moved to her present home at Larkfield in the Townhead area of the town in August. Fluffy has failed to turn up at the shop only twice in six months.

BOLTON

Good feeding is the secret to a successful marriage according to 82-year-old Mr. Fred Steadman, who celebrated sixty years of happiness with wife Mabel. “She feeds me well,” said Mr. Steadman, of Chapel Street, Bolton, Appleby. His wife agreed: “Fred loves his food. He has dinners twice a day,” she said.

50 YEARS

PENRITH

House building in Penrith has been somewhat stagnant in recent years, but increased development in this sphere is indicated by minutes of the Planning Committee to be submitted to a meeting of the Urban Council. Specifically interesting is the committee’s report that the Chief Constable, Mr. Frank Williamson, has informed them that it is proposed to provide 23 police houses in the town in the next five years.

Penrith Rural Council are inviting offers for a horse-box trailer which was found abandoned on the Penrith-Dalemain-Pooley Bridge road. Mr. A. D. Brown (clerk) was authorised to invite offers and accept the best made. The horse-box had been brought into the Council yard. One offer of £1 was turned down.

CRACKENTHORPE

A 56-year-old lorry driver had a miraculous escape in an accident on the Crackenthorpe by-pass, between Penrith and Appleby. He was Mr. Ernest Croxhall, Oxford Road, Gummersall, Cleckheaton, Yorkshire, whose southbound lorry left the road and sank up to the axles in soft earth by the side of the highway. The lorry was carrying a load of about thirty steel pipes, which ripped through the headboard and wrecked the driver’s side of the cab.

BRAITHWAITE

The Thornthwaite-with-Braithwaite Church of England School has been almost completely rebuilt to become one of the most modern primary schools in Cumberland. It was reopened and dedicated by the Bishop of Carlisle, the Right Rev. S. C. Bulley. The old school, built in 1904, cost £3,330, but now after a £30,000 reconstruction scheme there will be accommodation for 65 pupils, a study for the headmaster and a kitchen.

CATTERLEN

Little Dawn Archer is a baby who has made history. She is the first girl to be born in the Archer family in about 60 years! Her mother, Mrs. Patricia Archer, is a former Catterlen girl and Dawn’s father is P.C. Ray Archer, Stanley Road, Brampton, Carlisle. P.C. Archer is a past pupil of Penrith Queen Elizabeth Grammar School and his parents are Mr. and Mrs. William D. Archer, Pennine Way. Mr. William Archer said: “We are delighted at the arrival of Dawn. She is the first girl to be born in the family for four generations.”

100 YEARS

PENRITH

A meeting was held at the Boy Scouts’ headquarters when it was decided to form a Girl Guides corps. Miss Jean White, who presided, was elected captain; Miss F. Thistlewaite, lieutenant; and Miss Gladys Scott, town hall, secretary.

RENWICK

After a recent report of sheep being buried for 40 days in snowdrifts, there is a further remarkable instance. Three animals missing from the stock of Mr. John Thompson, Laypool, since Sunday, 7th January, were dug out of a drift on Thackmoor. Two were dead, but the third, a blackfaced ewe in lamb is doing well after 46 days’ burial.

NORTH STAINMORE

There was an interesting ceremony at North Stainmore Council School. Miss Mabel Raine, infants’ teacher, was presented with a silver inkstand, the gift of Miss Lumb, headmistress. This was handed over by Dora Brown, a pupil. Miss Raine is leaving to take up duties at High Hesket.


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