In this week in history 25 YEARS GREYSTOKE

Date: Monday 2nd October 2017
Pupils of Penrith’s County Infants’ School, Brunswick Road, present a cheque for £161.88 to Mrs. Joyce Martin, donations secretary of Penrith branch of the Save the Children Fund, during their harvest festival service 25 years ago. The money, which children raised by saving their pocket money, went to the Crisis in Africa appeal.
Pupils of Penrith’s County Infants’ School, Brunswick Road, present a cheque for £161.88 to Mrs. Joyce Martin, donations secretary of Penrith branch of the Save the Children Fund, during their harvest festival service 25 years ago. The money, which children raised by saving their pocket money, went to the Crisis in Africa appeal.

To stand on the summit of Everest in winter has been called the greatest challenge on Earth — and Greystoke man Myles Morley hopes to be the first British man to reach that goal. He is part of a Reserves Forces expedition in an attempt to conquer Everest in winter and to get reservists to the top of the world.

To stand on the summit of Everest in winter has been called the greatest challenge on Earth — and Greystoke man Myles Morley hopes to be the first British man to reach that goal. He is part of a Reserves Forces expedition in an attempt to conquer Everest in winter and to get reservists to the top of the world.

ULLSWATER

Part of the team which salvaged the world’s oldest working mechanically propelled boat from Ullswater were reunited on board exactly thirty years after the vessel was refloated. Steam launch Dolly, which spent 65 years on the bottom before being discovered and refloated by a team of divers, now takes pride of place in the collection at Windermere Steamboat Museum. The exact moment of its refloating was commemorated with a salute from the other steam launches and a reunion of Mr. George Pattinson and Dr. Gerry Jackson.

KESWICK

The people of Keswick have elected one of the youngest candidates for many years to serve on Keswick Town Council. Mr. Vincent Murphy, 29-year-old Labour candidate, won a resounding victory at a by-election. The election was called after Mr. Alistair Corfield resigned from his seat in the east ward of the town.

SKIRWITH

An Eden clergyman returned to his “theatrical past” as part of the celebrations of the 40th anniversary of the Century Theatre. The Rev. Arthur Wilson, vicar of Skirwith, Ousby and Melmerby since 1988, toured with the company before deciding to enter the ministry. It was, in fact, during his tours with the Century from 1954-56 that Mr. Wilson made his decision to quit acting and enter the Church.

NENTHEAD

Nenthead’s 16th leek show was held at the Miners Arms by kind permission of Mr. and Mrs. R. Clark. The judge was Peter Everett, assisted by Dennis Richardson.

PENRITH

Members of Penrith Residents’ Association are to explore further the possibility of the setting up of a town council for fear that the planned local government shake-up would leave the town underrepresented and without a voice. The decision to continue looking into the idea of a town council was taken at a public meeting despite a poor turn-out of 24 people of whom only three had no involvement with official organisations in the town.

50 YEARS

GREAT MUSGRAVE

Fears of foot and mouth disease on a North Westmorland farm were ended by the news that tests had proved negative. First news of a suspected case came when police imposed a standstill ban on livestock within five miles of Heanings Farm, Great Musgrave. Mr. Melville Watson, who has farmed at Heanings for the past four years, called in a veterinary surgeon on two of his herd of about a hundred Friesians — about fifty milking cows with followers.

PENRITH

How much will Penrith’s new swimming pool cost? £60,000 or £80,000; does anybody know? These were the questions asked at the meeting of the Urban Council when some members protested that although it had been said that negotiations about a site were taking place, the ratepayers had never been told how much the project would cost.

LAKELAND

How are people who like to drive out for an evening in a country inn going to react when the much-discussed breathalyser tests come into operation just ten days away? This is the question licensees of the many thriving country inns in Northern Lakeland are asking. Most are concerned to some degree about the effect the new law will have on the healthy trade brought by townspeople and visitors, and some have ideas to help drivers keep within the law. The chairman of the Penrith Licensed Victuallers Association, Mr. James Kirk, Black Swan Inn, Culgaith, sees a gloomy future for some country pubs — especially those in remote areas when almost all custom must come by road.

GRASMERE

Following the balloon race at Grasmere Sports, organised by Cumberland and Westmorland Association of Boys’ Clubs, tickets have been returned from all over England — and from Germany. Helga Schultz of Duisburg, Germany, has returned ticket 1325 which she found in Duisburg, Rahm, and receives a prize.

100 YEARS

SHAP

The death has taken place, at the age of 42, of one of the most notable athletes of his time in Cumberland and Westmorland, Mr. Charles Conchie. At the age of 19 he lost an arm while picking up a newspaper on the railway at Shap Granite Works, but in spite of this disability he became a very clever runner and jumper, winning many prizes.

PENRITH

A former Penrithian, Mr. J. R. Wilson, is making news in Vancouver, Canada, through his successful crusade to have the goat recognised as a milk producing animal. The “Weekly Courier” and “Goat World” have both devoted articles to this. Mr. Wilson, a son of Mrs. Wilson, Strickland Terrace, was coachman for the late Dr. Robertson when living in Penrith, and he emigrated on the death of Dr. Thomson.