In this week in history 25 YEARS GLENRIDDING

Date: Tuesday 28th November 2017

History was made at Glenridding as dignitaries and the media watched the switch-on of the first hydro-electric power station built by Norweb. The £500,000 scheme harnesses the power of water flowing from Helvellyn, above the former Greenside lead mines, to the village of Glenridding below. After being piped a mile down the fellside, a water turbine, manufactured by a specialist Kendal firm, converts the water’s power to electricity — sufficient to power 500 homes in the local area.

History was made at Glenridding as dignitaries and the media watched the switch-on of the first hydro-electric power station built by Norweb. The £500,000 scheme harnesses the power of water flowing from Helvellyn, above the former Greenside lead mines, to the village of Glenridding below. After being piped a mile down the fellside, a water turbine, manufactured by a specialist Kendal firm, converts the water’s power to electricity — sufficient to power 500 homes in the local area.

PENRITH

Penrith police are returning to pedal power in their fight against crime. Superintendent Mike Stevens said: “There’s nothing new about using bicycles but what we are doing is increasing the number of times officers use them. We have always done it to a certain extent.”

The curtains went up on a special celebration for past and present members of Penrith Players. A dinner was held at the town’s George Hotel to mark the Players’ 70th anniversary following the formation of the club on 22nd November, 1922.

Judges in a regional award scheme for shopping centre improvements have given the top prize to Angel Square in Penrith. The 1992 award scheme was organised jointly by northern branch of the Royal Town Planning Institute, the Northern Development Company and the Quality North Campaign.

Eden’s newest “bank” has opened — not in a town high street but at The Shed photographic workshop, Frenchfield Farm, near Penrith. The “bank” — the brainchild of professional photographers James and Mandy McAteer — will be a place for banking images in the form of old photographs and negatives. Image banking is a technique widely used by professionals working in the visual arts, but the idea at The Shed is to open up the facility to the community.

KIRKBY THORE

Dancing, enjoying life and walking six miles a day are the secrets of a happy, healthy life, according to Ralph and Eleanor Coulthard, who are celebrating their diamond wedding anniversary. Married at St. James’s Church, Temple Sowerby, on 1st December, 1932, Mr. and Mrs. Coulthard have lived at Kirkby Thore for over sixty years.

50 YEARS

TEMPLE SOWERBY

The death occurred at her home in West Bay, North Berwick, of Mrs. Dorothy Una McGrigor Phillips, formerly of Temple Sowerby Manor. As an authoress, Mrs. Philips used the name Dorothy Una Ratcliffe. Mrs. Philips was a lady of wide interests, embracing literary pursuits and the arts, a love of country life and natural history and travel. Possessed of considerable private means, she used both her talents and her money to encourage others, and indeed, by her support and personal interest, could be described as a patroness of societies and individuals.

PENRITH

Penrith traders, after spending over two hours considering the future of their town in the light of the by-pass, are to establish study groups to investigate possible ways of drawing more shoppers to the town. Mr. Lindsay Kidd — the man who instigated the meeting in St. Andrew’s Parish Rooms — suggested that groups of two or three suitable people could consider the question of publicity, the town’s car parking policy, shop hours and the provision of better services and recreational facilities.

Impulse took a young Penrith woman on a ten months’ long working holiday in Africa — and the work part meant anything from selling flowers to a job with the outlawed Rhodesian government. During her trip, Miss Georgina Kinmont, third daughter of Col. and Mrs. G. M. Kinmont, Beacon Hill, Fell Lane, Penrith, covered something like 6,000 miles and saw many of the African continent’s greatest sights.

Gardening is only one of the many hobbies of Mrs. Rhoda Wilson, Brentfield Way, Penrith, who at 79, digs her own garden and grows her own vegetables. A founder member of the Penrith Evergreen Club and its first vice-chairman, she still holds that office.

100 YEARS

BAMPTON

Mr. Leonard Mounsey, Butterwick Cragg, Bampton, met with a peculiar mishap. He was going on to the fell with a scythe and rake to mow bracken, when the scythe slipped from his shoulder, badly cutting his wrist and arm, which severed a nerve and rendered the arm useless. Dr. Nicholson, Shap, ordered his removal to Carlisle.

PENRITH

The inmates of the workhouse were entertained by a party of vocalists gathered together by Mr. A. B. Sinclair. The Chairman, Canon Byard, referred to the cheering news from France. The performers were Canon Byard, Messrs. J. Lancaster, J. B. Milburn, R. M. Rigg, G. Reed, A. E. Railton, G. Reynolds, A. B. Sinclair, J. Watson and F. Nelson.

MARDALE

There was a very large attendance for the shepherds’ meeting, and 150 sheep in the fold were all claimed. Messrs. T. Edmondson, Flake Howe, and T. Greenhowe, Naddle Forest, had charge of the fold.