In this week in history 25 YEARS EDEN

Date: Monday 24th December 2018

Eden Arts beat off stiff competition to win a runners-up prize in this year’s Northern Electric awards. The award was given to an individual or organisation making an outstanding contribution to the development of the arts. Melvyn Bragg, who hosted the event, praised Eden Arts for their work in Improving arts provision in a rural area.

Eden Arts beat off stiff competition to win a runners-up prize in this year’s Northern Electric awards. The award was given to an individual or organisation making an outstanding contribution to the development of the arts. Melvyn Bragg, who hosted the event, praised Eden Arts for their work in Improving arts provision in a rural area.

CUMBRIA

Latest British Tourist Authority figures show that Cumbria experienced the largest growth in overseas visitors in any part of mainland UK over the last ten years. However, Cumbria Tourist Board officers believe the region is under-performing in the overseas market.

KESWICK

A scheme to turn Keswick’s disused railway station into a wide-ranging arts centre has been greeted favourably by Allerdale councillors. A group of local artists has been formed in Keswick under the name Artshare and they are planning to use the old station buildings as workshops and as a venue for a variety of different arts.

Town councillors at Keswick have welcomed a National Trust scheme to thin out trees in Ings Wood, Keswick. The Trust intend removing 36 trees to allow more sunlight reach a pond. They say the work will benefit the aquatic life of the water and “improve the nature conservation value of the area”.

BORROWDALE

More than 5,000 tonnes of gravel from the River Derwent in Borrowdale has been used to reduce the gradients of paths in the Threlkeld area. The work on the paths has been done by northern area flood defence staff of the National Rivers Authority.

PENRITH

Food and drink sold well in the run-up to Christmas in Penrith, although the festive season was reportedly quiet for some town traders. A spokesman for the town branch of Kwik Save said things had been “pretty hectic” over the past fortnight, but custom had been average over the rest of the year. He added drink was as popular as ever, particularly since alcohol prices had been largely unaffected by the November budget.

LITTLE SALKELD

The run-up to Christmas was a busy time for Little Salkeld couple Jack and Mary Atkinson. As well as enjoying the festivities, the couple celebrated sixty years of married life. They were married at Addingham Church on 23rd December, 1933. Mary, originally from the Newcastle area, regularly came to Langwathby for holidays to visit an aunt. She met Jack during her visits and never went back home!

KIRKBY STEPHEN

Men in Kirkby Stephen will be able to examine their image, whether it be macho style or “new man”, thanks to a new group which will meet fortnightly in the town. The men’s group will be led by Simon Grimshaw, who lives in the High Street and runs the Greenman shop.

50 YEARS

LOWTHER

When the Earl of Lonsdale’s 21-year-old eldest daughter, Lady Jane Lowther, walked up the aisle of Lowther Parish Church of St. Michael’s amid the monuments and memorials of her ancestors dating back to the 1600s, she was the first member of the Lowther family to be married there for nearly three centuries and she was walking in the footsteps of a namesake, another Jane Lowther, in 1546. But the bridegroom was an American. The centuries’ old little church in Lowther Park — within sights of the shell of Lowther Castle, former stately home of the Earls of Lonsdale who are buried in the churchyard and standing on an eminence with a magnificent view of the tree fringed River Lowther below — was crowded for the ceremony with 275 guests from near and far.

BOWSCAR

Bowscar’s 83-year-old little All Hallows Church, right on the Plumpton boundary of Penrith St. Andrew’s Parish, may have been closed. Breaking the news, the December “Broadsheet” of the United Parish of Penrith and Newton Reigny, states: “There was a time when regular and good use was made of it, when a number of farming families took an interest in it and supported it. But, geographically and in other ways it had seemed ‘out on a limb’ and in recent years has been left open solely by a few people from St. Andrew’s going specifically for the monthly service.”

KESWICK

Home on one of his rare visits to Keswick is Mr. William S. (“Bill”) Cowen who, after a successful business life in the town, has spent the last 16 years mainly in East Africa photographing and filming the country and its wildlife on a freelance basis. Mr. Cowen, who founded the chemist’s and optician’s practice now handled by his son Donald, embarked on his business career in Keswick in 1926 following service in the first World War and after he had qualified professionally.

100 YEARS

PENRITH

Lord Lonsdale is to lay aside a portion of the Penrith Beacon as a permanent war memorial. The Beacon, which is some 300 acres in extent, and was, until recently, covered by pine and similar trees which were felled by the Canadian Forestry Corps., is part of Lord Lonsdale’s estate. His generous offer was announced by Mr. Tom Smith, chairman of the Urban Council, and Mr. Smith is to apply, on behalf of the town, for permission to use the Beacon each year.

Among the recipients of military honours at an investiture at Buckingham Palace was Lieut. C. R. Alderson, eldest son of Mrs. Alderson, Albion Temperance Hotel, Penrith, and formerly of Appleby, who received the Military Cross.