In this week in history 25 YEARS EDEN

Date: Tuesday 22nd May 2018
Lyvennet Young Farmers put their best foot forward in a sponsored walk in fancy dress 25 years ago.
Lyvennet Young Farmers put their best foot forward in a sponsored walk in fancy dress 25 years ago.

Nursing an injured swan back to health and going to the aid of a drowning duck is just par for the course for local animal lover Margaret Howe. Wild birds and animals that come to grief can be sure of help if Mrs. Howe hears of their plight. “I absolutely love them,” she said.

Nursing an injured swan back to health and going to the aid of a drowning duck is just par for the course for local animal lover Margaret Howe. Wild birds and animals that come to grief can be sure of help if Mrs. Howe hears of their plight. “I absolutely love them,” she said.

Despite strong objections from Eden residents, district planning officers are recommending council approval for plans for a holiday village at Whinfell Forest. A report by chief planning officer Graham Allan agrees with the county council’s verdict that the economic value of the scheme outweighs any environmental objections.

PENRITH

A legal move which could kill off the controversial Skirsgill mart market has emerged only hours after a new application for the Saturday market was submitted to Eden by auction firm Penrith Farmers’ and Kidd’s. The revelation came as Eden’s Works and Leisure Committee discussed a proposal by Penrith Chamber of Trade to change the town’s market day from Tuesday to Saturday. Eden solicitor Harold Harrison said if an official, statutory market was held in the town on the same day as the one at Skirsgill, the council could legally close down the out-of-town traders without a fight.

A former facelift plan for the town is to go on show at the end of the month. Penrith Civic Society and Eden District Council’s planning department, with the support of Cumbria county library service, will be holding an exhibition at the town library.

KESWICK

Keswick’s new police inspector is planning close links with the local community in the battle against crime. Inspector David Watson has taken over from Inspector Bob Fell, who has moved to duties in Whitehaven. Inspector Watson is planning meetings with Keswick Town Council and parish councils in the area, the aim being to strengthen links between the force and local communities.

LAKE DISTRICT

Walking enthusiasts from all over Britain are expected to take a nostalgic trek to the Lake District to celebrate the centenary of Britain’s first packaged walking holiday. Held to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Countrywide Holidays Association, the event at the Lake District National Park Visitor Centre, near Ambleside, will follow some of the favourite trails blazed by a Victorian pastor when he pioneered the idea of budget-priced activity breaks for the working classes.

APPLEBY

Guests and councillors gathered to witness the pomp and ceremony of the traditional mayor-making ceremony in Appleby. The age-old ceremony, which takes place in the town’s historic Moot Hall, has changed little over the years and this occasion was to be no different.

50 YEARS

PENRITH

The 93rd annual report of the directors of Penrith Farmers’ and Kidd’s Auction Company, dealing with the year to 31st March, records that the turnover was £5,600,564 and the profit, after taxation, was £24,231.

The man who began his career in football management with a team of amateurs at Penrith just nine years ago will step out on to the hallowed turf of Wembley at the head of cup finalists West Bromwich Albion. Many messages of good wishes are being sent to Mr. Alan Ashman from friends he made during his four years in charge of Penrith’s Northern League side — the first chapter in a remarkable success story.

Wearing a military uniform of 150 years ago, Private Tony Slessor, Penrith, is posted as guard over battle trophies on St. George’s Day in Cyprus. He is serving with The King’s Own Royal Border Regiment. St. George’s Day is also traditionally observed as the battalion’s Regimental Day and was celebrated at Episkopi, Cyprus, where the battalion is based.

PENRUDDOCK

“There is no doubt that we will be inconvenienced and have many problems,” Mr. Nigel F. Hudleston told a meeting of landowners and occupiers who discussed the possible effects of the proposed Penruddock by-pass at a meeting in the Village Hall. But, said Mr. Huddleston, they must consider the problems of West Cumberland. “We might like to say to hell with West Cumberland, they can get on themselves. But we are all Cumbrians and we must seriously consider their difficulties.”

100 YEARS

KESWICK

There was an interesting discussion on whether a proposed Citizens’ Association should be restricted to women, when a public meeting was held in Crosthwaite Parish Room. The Rev. W. E. Bradley presided and Miss C. E. Marshall spoke on “The Parliamentary vote, its responsibilities and opportunities”. Mr. J. Broatch spoke lucidly on the subject of women’s voting, the first requirement being that a woman must be at least thirty years of age. It was agreed to form a Citizens’ Association on non-party lines and Miss Highton was appointed secretary.

GLENRIDDING

Private Fred Lake, R.A.M.C., formerly a journalist in Penrith, has written of an interesting encounter in a French hospital. “I was rather surprised when a stretcher case spoke to me by name and in proper Westmorland dialect. The patient proved to be Private G. J. Pattinson, Glenridding, who is out here with a siege, battery ammunition column,” writes Private Lake. He added that he had had “a good crack” with Private Pattinson and the two men discovered a number of mutual acquaintances.