In this week in history 25 YEARS EDEN

Date: Monday 14th May 2018
Touching down are American football stars Hospital Hornets, alias staff at Penrith New Hospital, who took part in Penrith’s May Day celebration 25 years ago.
Touching down are American football stars Hospital Hornets, alias staff at Penrith New Hospital, who took part in Penrith’s May Day celebration 25 years ago.

Eden tops the poll as the favourite holiday destination in the county for day trippers. Such is the area’s popularity for day trips that it attracts just under five million visitors during the main season — beating other districts such as the traditional tourist haunt of South Lakeland.

Eden tops the poll as the favourite holiday destination in the county for day trippers. Such is the area’s popularity for day trips that it attracts just under five million visitors during the main season — beating other districts such as the traditional tourist haunt of South Lakeland.

Top level investigations into global warming are centring on an isolated location high in the Eden Pennines. Moor House national nature reserve, between Garrigill and Milburn —a focus of upland research for more than forty years — has been designated as part of the United Kingdom Environmental Change Network (ECN). Scientists expect the effects of global warming will first be detected among the plants and animals of the hilltops, hence Moor House’s importance in the national initiative.

The name “Eden” has been rejected as the new title for the Penrith and the Border parliamentary constituency. Boundary Commissioners for England say the seat contains more than the Eden Valley and stretches further north to the Scottish Border.

KESWICK

Keswick Mountain Rescue Team, who operate from “four near derelict domestic garages” — are looking for a new headquarters after completing their busiest year. The Keswick team are now the joint busiest in Lakeland along with Langdale/Ambleside after responding to a record 83 rescue calls in 1992 — an increase of more than 20 incidents over 1991.

APPLEBY

Veteran county councillor Steele Addison was in jubilant mood as he retained his seat and welcomed his sister, Mary Warburton, as Appleby’s new councillor after Cumbria’s four-yearly elections. “I am very pleased for Mary, it’s terrific,” said Mr. Addison. Mrs. Warburton, a farmer’s widow from Colby Laithes, was involved in a close-run contest for the Appleby seat with Liberal Democrat candidate Jonty Rostron, winning by 267 votes.

PENRITH

Brilliant sunshine and huge crowds welcomed what could well be the last Penrith May Day carnival after thirteen years of successful organisation and charity fund-raising by the town’s Lions Club. But while the future of the bank holiday might be in doubt, Lions Club members promised: “If there is a May Day next year, there will be a Penrith celebration.”

PENRITH

Traders in Penrith’s Castlegate are up in arms over highways work following the closure of the road for the third time in three years. Ian Foggo, owner of the Chef’s Kitchen, said trade was between sixty and eighty per cent. down as a result of the street closure.

50 YEARS

TEBAY

An 11-year-old cat belonging to Mr. John H. Hornell, Low Lane, Tebay, adopted five young rabbits and is fostering them. The young rabbits were found by Mr. Hornell after his dog had brought in a dead rabbit. The cat had had kittens the day before and obligingly accepted the rabbits as additions to her family. Unfortunately, some of the rabbits have since died.

PENRITH

This is the story of a car which travelled uphill — with the engine off! It happened not once but half-a-dozen times and the mystified motorist intends to return to the spot with an independent witness to view the phenomenon. Mr. Joe Tindal, Carleton Road, Penrith, — who has a butchers’ and grocery shop in Great Dockray — was in a side road near Oswestry, Shropshire, in his E-Type Jaguar. He decided to stop for five minutes to enjoy the view and was about to reverse the car into a convenient spot. “I was going to reverse up the hill when suddenly I realised the car was going back on its own,” Mr. Tindal told a “Herald” reporter this week. The only possible reason Mr. Tindal could advance was that electricity cables above the roadway created a magnetic field which drew his car backwards.

KESWICK

A Keswick girl, Miss Kathleen Albion, who emigrated to Canada in 1966 with her parents, has been featured in her local newspaper of her new home as “a refreshing view of youth — youth doing a full day’s work with time for healthful recreation and constructive civic interest.”

100 YEARS

PENRITH

Canon Byard, Vicar of St. Andrew’s, has volunteered for service with the Church Army. In his absence the Rev. R. H. Law, Vicar of the Christ Church, and the Rev. C. P. Moore are to be responsible for the work.

KESWICK

With the death of Quartermaster Fred S. Martin, attention has once more been drawn to the notable record of the old Rugby football team. Members of the team rallied round with such enthusiasm that over 60 brave lads joined the Border Regiment in one week.