In this week in history 25 YEARS EDEN

Date: Tuesday 16th January 2018

Eden Council chairman Eric Woof has defended the spending of £7,000 on commissioning a painting for Penrith’s new library. As he officially unveiled Blencarn artist Alan Stones’s vision of “Eden”, Mr. Woof rose to quell any criticism that the public money could have been better spent in times of recession.

Eden Council chairman Eric Woof has defended the spending of £7,000 on commissioning a painting for Penrith’s new library. As he officially unveiled Blencarn artist Alan Stones’s vision of “Eden”, Mr. Woof rose to quell any criticism that the public money could have been better spent in times of recession.

Eden District Council are being challenged to give away £100,000 to local school support groups, parish councils and other clubs and organisations as part of a new approach to waste recycling. Instead of spending £219,000 on new refuse collection vehicles — which the council are planning to do — local groups should be encouraged to recycle much more refuse and be paid for doing so.

MARTINDALE

When the going got tough it was a case of “on yer bike” for postman Paul Reed, who climbed on his mountain bike to brave the wintry conditions and get the mail through to Howtown and Martindale. Based at Penrith’s Crown Square post office, 34-year-old Paul has been a postman for the past fourteen years and normally does the Martindale round. Driving the postbus, he set out as normal in the winter conditions, except that his mountain bike was in the back in case of emergency. Just past the Sharrow Bay Hotel the minibus got stuck on a steep incline and Paul was forced to abandon it and take to two wheels, carrying the pouch of letters round his neck.

KENDAL

Cumbria police confirmed that a light aircraft they have been using on trial for surveillance had to make an emergency landing after engine failure. The Cessna single-engined aircraft was flying above the Kendal area when it had to make an unscheduled landing in a field near Killington. There had been no damage to any other party and nobody was injured as a result.

PENRITH

A meeting of Penrith traders was told that fifteen shops in the town centre had been forced out of business as a direct result of the Saturday market. Mr. Keith Darby, proprietor of J. and J. Graham, said: “You do not need to be a mathematical genius to work out that 10,000 shoppers visiting 150 stalls each week are diverting huge sums of money week on week cumulatively throughout the year, running into many millions of pounds, not only from the town centre of Penrith but also from the local economy.”

RAVENSTONEDALE

Eden beagle Zanto is among “top of the pups” in Britain after taking part in a special champion-of-champions final in London. Owned and bred by Mrs. Christine Lewis, Fallowfield, Ravenstonedale, nine-month-old Zanto was among the top thirty in a prestigious “pup parade”. The event was the noted Spillers Winalot and “Dog World” final — now in its 21st year — which aims to find the pup of the year.

KESWICK

Keswick Town Council are calling on all the areas which look like losing their individual postmarks to unite in fighting the move by the Post Office. Keswick was told recently that their town postmark would shortly disappear and all mail posted locally would be likely to be franked “Cumbria, Dumfries and Galloway”.

50 YEARS

PENRITH

Mr. Ronald Dargue acted quickly and saved his wife from serious injury when a load of tree trunks crashed down on to the car in which she was sitting in a Penrith street. Mr. Dargue, aged 34, a cinema projectionist, Solway Street, Silloth, was in his mother’s home in Drovers Lane when he heard a crash outside. Looking through the window, he saw a huge load of twenty tree trunks about to tip over on to the car in which his 35-year-old wife, Evelyn, was sitting. “She didn’t seem to realise what was happening so I ran outside and got her half out of the car when the load hit it,” said Mr. Dargue.

The Church Com-missioners have decided to proceed with the scheme for the union of the parishes of Christ Church and St. Andrew’s, Penrith, notwithstanding objections which were put forward when the scheme was first announced.

KESWICK

An ordinary terrier dog named Ben became the centre of attraction when it was learned that he now has £5,000 in the bank to keep him for the rest of his days. The dog, a black and tan Lakeland, was formerly owned by Mrs. Madeline Arnison, of Blencathra Street, Keswick, who in her will left £5,000 to be invested and the interest to be used to look after Ben. The dog, looking extremely fit for 14 years, now lives with Mr. and Mrs. John Porter in their house in Church Street, which was his second home when he was owned by Mrs. Arnison.

100 YEARS

PENRITH

The death has occurred of Mrs. Simpson, widow of Mr. R. Simpson, Victoria Road, aged 90. Believed to be Penrith’s second oldest inhabitant, she was a sister of the late Mr. William Seatree, Penrith.

WARCOP

A coal famine came to an end when, to the joy of many people in the neighbourhood, a fresh supply arrived at the railway station and the coal leaders had a very busy time.

KIRKOSWALD

Celebrating 50 years of happily married life are Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Harrison, Lowfield. Married at Addingham Church in 1868, they have lived at Lowfield ever since, but intend leaving at the end of the month to a smaller house in the village.