In this week in history 25 YEARS CUMBRIA

Date: Monday 5th November 2018

Cumbria’s worn-out roads could be under even more pressure as Government spending limits force cuts in the county council’s highways budget. A large number of Cumbria’s roads are already below national standards but worse is likely to come.

Cumbria’s worn-out roads could be under even more pressure as Government spending limits force cuts in the county council’s highways budget. A large number of Cumbria’s roads are already below national standards but worse is likely to come.

EAMONT BRIDGE

Work begins on a £3.5 million fire service therapy centre at Eamont Bridge, alongside the River Eamont. Development will take place in two parts, beginning with fourteen sheltered homes, due for occupation in June, to be followed by the creation of the 40-bedroom short-stay therapy centre, for injured, disabled and retired fire officers and their relatives.

KIRKBY STEPHEN

Around 1,500 people attended the three-day bypass exhibition in the town. There was also a good response to questionnaires sent out by Cumbria County Council. So far, out of those returned, eighty per cent. are for town enhancement with fifty per cent. of those asking for it to be on a restrained scale.

PENRITH

A Penrith doctor has just returned home after sixteen days in the wilds of Borneo on a jungle survival course led by an Eden-based outward bound instructor. Dr. Helen Long was one of seven students on a course led by survival expert Peter Charnley and two colleagues.

A petition of more than 1,100 names of customers of a Penrith fish and chip shop failed to sway the county council from slapping double yellow lines on a busy road leading out of the town. In a bid to stop parked cars blocking the A6, the Highways and Transportation Sub-Committee agreed to ban parking along Stricklandgate and Scotland Road, as far as the junction with Drovers Lane.

KESWICK

Organisers of Keswick’s annual Guy Fawkes night celebrations were faced with a late drive to collect materials after vandals set light to the bonfire five nights early. Keswick Round Table organise the event every year to raise money for local charities.

APPLEBY

Cumbria County Council employee Geoffrey Sowerby, of Appleby, is to receive a long-service award. Mr. Sowerby joined the council in November, 1958, and has been a road worker at the Crackenthorpe depot for most of his career.

Appleby’s Royal Oak Inn has been named national pub of the year in the Good Pub Guide. The guide said the Royal Oak was one of the very few pubs which managed to be held in equal high regard by its regulars and its many visitors.

50 YEARS

ALSTON

A traffic survey taken in the Alston area two years ago has indicated that a bypass for the town would be the solution for through traffic as a long-term relief. More immediate measures to improve the flow of traffic, say minutes of the Highways Committee to come before Cumberland County Council, include new direction signs, imposing waiting restrictions and marking out car parks.

CUMBERLAND

A total of £33,010,000 would be needed to improve 470 miles of roads in Cumberland to the standard required by increased usage, says a report by the County Surveyor, Mr. F. L. Broughton, contained in minutes of the Highways Committee to come before Cumberland County Council.

LANGWATHBY

If a resolution of the Highways Committee is approved at a meeting of Cumberland County Council, a special sub-committee will meet Langwathby Parish Council to discuss schemes for a new bridge to replace the one washed away earlier in the year, or for a bypass of the village. The minutes say schemes costing £460,700 and £328,000 are unlikely to get any grant-in-aid from the Ministry in the foreseeable future, but a third scheme had been investigated.

CALDBECK

Caldbeck’s oldest resident, Mr. Tom Savage, now in his 90th year, can still be seen taking his daily walk, after making a remarkable recovery from a severe illness last March. Tom left school at the age of 13 and started work at 50s., for the half year — about 1/11d. per week.

APPLEBY

Eighteen-year-old former Appleby boy Jonathan Dent Dixon has been successful in passing the Common Entrance Examination for the University of Oxford and has been awarded a place to read English Literature at Pembroke College.

100 YEARS

KIRKBY STEPHEN

Lieut. Richard Cecil Hallam, third son of the late Mr. R. T. W. Hallam, Morecambe, and formerly of Kirkby Stephen, and brother of Mr. W. W. Hallam, solicitor and magistrates’ clerk, Kirkby Stephen, has been awarded the Croix de Guerre by General Petain for securing the evacuation of the civil population of a town in the front line.

PENRITH

At a meeting of the Food Control Committee the Inspector, Mr. J. Sharp, reported that he was visiting public houses about 4d. beer. The executive officer, Mr. G. Wainwright, said there was a 4d. beer and a 5d. beer and there was a suspicion that 4d. beer was being sold at 5d. Much amusement was caused when Mr. W. Johnstone asked: Has he to sample it? Mr. W. H. Johnstone: I suggest the committee sample it. Mr. Wainwright promptly asked for volunteers!