In this week in history 25 YEARS CLIFTON

Date: Monday 7th August 2017
The charity team at Leeming House, Watermillock, set a new fund-raising record when they completed a sponsored bed push from Pooley Bridge to Glenridding 25 years ago.
The charity team at Leeming House, Watermillock, set a new fund-raising record when they completed a sponsored bed push from Pooley Bridge to Glenridding 25 years ago.

The Lowther and Croasdale sawmill at Clifton was a blazing inferno as fire crews from Penrith, Shap, Lazonby and Appleby battled to save the premises, which are part of the Lowther estate. Fire ripped through the storage shed and main machinery shed as fitters were carrying out regular maintenance work at the mill.

The Lowther and Croasdale sawmill at Clifton was a blazing inferno as fire crews from Penrith, Shap, Lazonby and Appleby battled to save the premises, which are part of the Lowther estate. Fire ripped through the storage shed and main machinery shed as fitters were carrying out regular maintenance work at the mill.

PENRITH

Traders are to object to the renewal of planning permission for the Saturday market at the Skirsgill auction mart, on the outskirts of Penrith. Members of the Chamber of Trade agreed that the complicated issue could have a serious long-term effect on the town and should be seriously considered.

Four out of five Penrith shoppers prefer the present town centre parking to Eden Council’s plan to pedestrianise Market Square. In a “Herald” survey shoppers voiced their concerns about the possible loss of the short-stay car park.

APPLEBY

Sprightly octogenarian Jack Steadman knocked the spots off his much younger rivals in a pool tournament. Jack, of Chapel Street, Appleby, decided to take part in an over-18s tournament, although he had never played the game before, while on holiday with the town’s Stick and Wheel Club at a Pontin’s holiday camp. To his surprise and delight he reached the final, only to be beaten by a competitor from Liverpool half his age.

A major musical event staged near Appleby has saved thirteen acres of rain forest from destruction. A concert, barbecue and disco organised by Elaine Brass, Stephen Atkinson and Martin Railton, all from Appleby, raised a total of £420 for The Earth charity.

KESWICK

High standards of play and sound finances are ensuring that Keswick Squash Club is weathering the “squash recession” better than others, members were told at the annual meeting. Secretary Lyn Thompson said that highlights included the winning by the ladies’ A team of the first division trophy for the third time and the men’s A team gaining promotion to the second division.

50 YEARS

PENRITH

A suggestion that by using a number of old cottages adjoining his bus station in Sandgate, Penrith, as stores, Mr. Ernest Hartness was holding up the development of a modern bus station for the town was made at a planning inquiry at Penrith. The suggestion was refuted by Mr. Hartness’s solicitor, Mr. G. N. Worthington, who said there were no plans for a new bus station and if the cottages were not used by Mr. Hartness they would remain empty. Their demolition would do nothing to improve the traffic flow.

Excited pop fans invaded a Penrith newsagent’s shop, when news spread that the teenage idols, Paul and Barry Ryan, were shopping there. The scene was Messrs. Arragon’s shop in Middlegate, where the Ryan twins were purchasing books and magazines. Within minutes, the fans were clamouring for autographs, even though the boys tried to pretend they were not really the Ryan brothers — but nobody was fooled. Paul and Barry’s latest record, “Claire”, is currently in the charts.

DACRE

A well-known personality in Women’s Institute circles in Cumberland, Mrs. Ruth Armine MacInnes, Rose Bank, Dacre, is leaving the county to reside with her married daughter, Mrs. Margaret Barrow, who lives near Bath. Mrs. MacInnes, who is approaching 90 years, is a founder member of the movement in Cumberland and countrywomen in the county have cause to be grateful for what she has done during the past half-century.

CULGAITH

Crossing keeper Mr. Jimmy Richardson is one of the railway signalmen who regularly do duty at the Culgaith railway crossing, one of the few manned crossings left in this area. About 100 trains each day pass the crossing, on the Carlisle to Settle line, and each time the gates have to be closed to traffic on the road linking Culgaith with the A.66 road. Mr. Richardson lives at Langwathby.

KIRKBY STEPHEN

Kirkby Stephen’s fine old parish church, with its cloisters enclosing neat lawns and showing off the thirteenth century building to the best advantage, attracts many visitors and this summer there have been more than ever before. “There have been so many at times that I have had to take the position of verger and show them over the building,” says the Vicar, the Rev. N. B. Scott.

100 YEARS

KESWICK

A tennis tournament was held in Fitz Park when there were 32 entrants. Winners were Master B. Harris, Portinscale, and Miss Nicholls, Keswick; Mr. Mott and Mrs. Pearson; Mr. Bates and Miss B. Gardiner.

PENRITH

Lady Horsley, the widow of Sir Victor Horsley, the famous physician who died in Mesopotamia, has sent to Mr. J. E. Horsley, Friar Street, a handsome full-length portrait of Sir Victor in khaki uniform. Mr. Horsley is descended from the same family as Sir Victor Horsley and during the latter’s stay at Eden Grove a few years ago, Sir Victor and Lady Horsley paid their Penrith namesake a friendly visit to discuss their common origins.