In this week in history 25 YEARS APPLEBY

Date: Tuesday 4th July 2017
Some of the Great Strickland sports fancy dress competitors 25 years ago. Left to right: Philip Armstrong, Bethany Armstrong, Mrs. Sandra Armstrong, Richard Armstrong, Sonia Wright, Mathew Tupling, Shaun Wright, Mrs. Joan Wright and Grace Tupling.
Some of the Great Strickland sports fancy dress competitors 25 years ago. Left to right: Philip Armstrong, Bethany Armstrong, Mrs. Sandra Armstrong, Richard Armstrong, Sonia Wright, Mathew Tupling, Shaun Wright, Mrs. Joan Wright and Grace Tupling.

A former Methodist minister from Appleby, his wife and four children are caught up in the horrors of war-torn Yugoslavia. The Rev. Peter MacKenzie lives in Zagreb, which has come under heavy fire from the Serbian Army.

A former Methodist minister from Appleby, his wife and four children are caught up in the horrors of war-torn Yugoslavia. The Rev. Peter MacKenzie lives in Zagreb, which has come under heavy fire from the Serbian Army.

PENRITH

Penrithians have named the town buildings they most love to hate. An opinion poll taken by Penrith Civic Society as part of Environment Week revealed that Voreda House, in Portland Place, and BOCM feed mill, on Penrith industrial estate, were the town’s ugliest buildings. Close behind were the Focus DIY store in Ullswater Road, The Crescent in Clifford Road and a derelict garage property in Victoria Road. The contest for Penrith’s best designed building was clearly won by the market arcade and library, followed by the Angel Square development and the NFU building in Cromwell Road.

A major Penrith road is still closed four days after it was discovered a highly explosive combination of petrol was seeping into drains in Ullswater Road. The discovery by an off-duty fireman led to a huge emergency clean-up operation. Investigations are still continuing but the source of the petrol is baffling experts.

EDEN

An Eden woman has been awarded one of the highest honours of the Anglican Church in Ghana. In a surprise presentation at St. Michael’s Church, Brough, the Bishop of Kumasi gave villager Miss Audrey Lonie the “bishop’s badge of honour”. The medal is awarded by the diocesan synod for exceptional service to the church in Ghana, and Bishop Edmund Yeboah said: “We give them very sparingly and Miss Lonie is one of a few non-Ghanaians who have ever received this honour.”

KESWICK

Keswick town councillors expressed surprise at their meeting over the reports of bad behaviour at polling stations during the recent market referendum in the town. The returning officer, Mr. Andrew Wallbank, had alleged that his staff suffered ill-mannered, intemperate and hostile attitudes from voters. One Allerdale councillor, Mr. Jim Hully, even claimed polling staff had been spat at.

A Keswick beekeeper claims he has bred a new strain of super bees which can produce far more honey than a normal colony. Brian Taylor, who has been keeping bees for more than 45 years, puts his success down to careful breeding over the years and not interfering with the bees too much.

50 YEARS

PENRITH

Extensions to Ullswater and Tynefield schools in Penrith and the development of playing fields at a total cost of £390,829 came before Cumberland Education Committee for approval. Minutes of a Northern Area Education Committee said the proposals were to extend the accommodation of the two schools from 450 to 750 each at an estimated cost of £390,829, including site investigation costs and £25,000 for playing field development.

The long-awaited infant school on the Scaws Estate, Penrith, is included in the building program for next year but at the meeting of Cumberland Education Committee it was suggested that an attempt be made to substitute an instalment of the proposed junior school on the Wetheriggs estate. The Committee was asked to approve the setting up of a sub-committee to consider whether permission should be sought from the Minister to build part of the Wetheriggs school in place of the Scaws school.

NORTH WESTMORLAND

An Army bomb disposal squad was called to North Westmorland following the discovery of a 3lb. “bomb.” A motorway worker found the object, 9in. long with a 3in. nosecap, in a heap of soil near Strickland Mill. Police viewed the cylindrical object, which is chrome coloured, before calling in the bomb disposal squad from York.

WARCOP

That Warcop’s traditional rushbearing ceremony has lost none of its appeal to both children and adults is a tribute to the work of those who have undertaken organisation down the years. This year’s ceremony — blessed by another Warcop tradition, fine weather— took place when a total of 51 girls and boys bore their crowns of flowers and crosses of reeds to the village church for the rushbearing service.

LITTLE SALKELD

Two anglers narrowly escaped death during a violent thunderstorm which hit the East Cumberland fellsides. Mr. Jack Nicholson, Thacka Lane, Penrith, and Mr. John Burton, Council Houses, Little Salkeld, had been fishing in the River Eden near Little Salkeld. They had come out of the water and were dismantling their gear on the bank when a giant ash tree, under which they were standing, was hit by a thunderbolt. Both men were bowled over as the tree disintegrated. Neither man was severely injured.

100 YEARS

PENRITH

Sergt.-Major F. Melville, of the Canadian Dragoons, has been awarded the French Croix de Guerre for exceptionally gallant conduct in a reconnaissance. He has since been further mentioned in despatches. Sergt.-Major Melville, a brother of Inspector Melville, Penrith, was formerly in the Cumberland and Westmorland Police, serving at Penrith. He went to Canada on the outbreak of war and two years ago he was severely wounded.

KIRKBY STEPHEN

Very few men offered their services at the initial hirings. Many had already been engaged privately. As much as £16 was obtained for a month’s service, plus maintenance, such was the level of wages being asked.