In this week in history 25 YEARS ALSTON

Date: Tuesday 30th October 2018

Large signs, warning potential criminals that the area is under surveillance, will soon be greeting anybody driving into the Alston Moor area. The new signs are going up on all the roads going into Alston Moor as part of a project to expand a local farm watch scheme and combat a recent crime wave in the area.

Large signs, warning potential criminals that the area is under surveillance, will soon be greeting anybody driving into the Alston Moor area. The new signs are going up on all the roads going into Alston Moor as part of a project to expand a local farm watch scheme and combat a recent crime wave in the area.

PENRITH/KESWICK

The prospect of Penrith getting a town council and Keswick breaking away from Allerdale to join an expanded Eden district were raised at a public meeting. The possibilities have emerged as part of the debate on local government after the future of Cumbria’s county and district councils was put in doubt by government plans to give the present system across the whole of England a radical shake-up.

KIRKBY STEPHEN

Cumbria County Council plans for a Kirkby Stephen bypass — an idea first mooted in the town in 1936 — were opened up for public consultation, prior to the county seeking planning permission and Department of Transport funding for the work. The preferred bypass line and plans for associated town enhancement work were outlined by Bob Allan, chief engineer for traffic with the county council’s highways and transportation department.

GREAT SALKELD

Children and parents from the village of Great Salkeld helped the British Trust for Conservation Volunteers undertake some vital clearance of the historic village pond. Once used as a watering place by local cattle, over the years the pond has slowly become overgrown by reedmace and weed and choked up with dead leaves. The work was timed to coincide with the school half-term and also to minimise any disturbance to aquatic life.

PENRITH

Penrith Civic Society chairman Mark Andrew called for “unsavoury” areas of the town’s industrial estates to be improved. Mr. Andrew, Beacon Edge, Penrith, stood down after three years at the helm of the environmental pressure group. At the society’s annual meeting he said he hoped Eden Council’s planning department would insist on high design standards and landscaping on any future industrial developments.

APPLEBY

Members of the town’s 1st scout group took part in the annual world jamboree on air. A special licence allows scouts to speak to each other all over the world on radio ham frequencies and Bill Capstick arranged a call sign for the Appleby scouts to take part.

KESWICK

A move to delay the granting of a licence to Keswick footballers for use of Walker Park was thrown out by Keswick Town Council. Paul Buttle wanted the council to wait until the future of Fitz Park had been decided. “If this council does take on Fitz Park it will mean considerable expenditure for us,” he said.

50 YEARS

PENRITH

The failure of a Penrith grocery business was explained as being mainly due to yellow parking restriction lines on the road outside the shop, it was said at a public examination at Carlisle. Mr. Thomas Gray Brandreth, aged 56, Holme Rigg Avenue, Penrith, said that the lines had prevented the sale of his grocery store in Victoria Road. He also said that unemployment and another store nearby “going self service” had contributed to the failings of the business.

Shopgirls and early morning shoppers near the junction of Corn Market and Market Square, Penrith, were intrigued and alarmed to see a green parakeet parading on the main road, in immediate danger from passing traffic. The “jay walker” was soon rounded up by a combined operation on the part of two postmen, a butcher and a hairdresser — all duly wary of the bird’s formidable beak, so that no harm was done — and it was promptly boxed and taken to the nearby pet shop. It had escaped the previous evening when owner Mr. Joe Hughes was bringing it and its companion from the greenhouse into the house.

There have been three serious accidents in the last fortnight involving unauthorised vehicles on the Penrith motorway bypass which is still under construction and not open to the public. The danger caused by these intruding vehicles has become so great that a permanent police patrol is maintained on the nine-mile motorway. The police are also pointing out to motorists that when they trespass on the road their insurance becomes invalid.

“The Flying Curate” — that’s the name the Rev. David Crook, a curate at St. Andrew’s Church, Penrith, has earned. For Mr. Crook has twice taken part in sponsored walks on Sundays and has had to run the course so that he could fit in morning and evening services. His latest walk-run was when he helped raise funds for youth work in Penrith.

100 YEARS

ALSTON

Owing to the prevalence of influenza, all the schools in Alston, Nenthead, Garrigill and Leadgate have been closed. All entertainments have also been cancelled.

PENRITH

Canon Byard, Vicar of Penrith, is to return home, having completed his period of service with the Church Army in France.

SOUTHWAITE

Mr. H. E. Roberts, Moncastle, Southwaite, was successful at the recent Kilmarnock foal show. He took first and second prizes in the two-year-old filly class with two exhibits by Dunure Footprint, and was also first for colt foals. In addition he won a special prize for the best Clydesdale foal.