In this week in history 25 YEARS AGO — 1994 WATERMILLOCK

Date: Tuesday 5th February 2019

Novelist Joan Eadington proved to be an “L” of a driver when she finally passed her test after trying for thirty years. Mrs. Eadington, aged 67, of Watermillock, has lost count of the number of times she has taken the test and failed, but she believes it is well over twenty. “I dread to think how much it has cost,” she said. She first began learning after winning a Vauxhall Victor in a competition.

Novelist Joan Eadington proved to be an “L” of a driver when she finally passed her test after trying for thirty years. Mrs. Eadington, aged 67, of Watermillock, has lost count of the number of times she has taken the test and failed, but she believes it is well over twenty. “I dread to think how much it has cost,” she said. She first began learning after winning a Vauxhall Victor in a competition.

HOWTOWN

Howtown Outdoor Education Centre faced the axe as part of a multi-million pound cost-cutting exercise by the owners, Durham County Council. Staff at Howtown, led by head Steve Mitchell, put up a stiff fight to preserve the centre, which has been running for thirty years. It takes children from County Durham and teaches them a range of outdoor activities and leadership training as part of their social development.

KESWICK

A member of the First Keswick Guides will experience the international side of the movement when she visits Trinidad and Tobago. During a two-week camp, Julie Robinson will be helping to celebrate the 80th anniversary of guiding on the Caribbean islands. The 15-year-old Keswick School pupil is one of just a dozen guides who have been selected to take part in the celebrations.

PATTERDALE

Members of Patterdale mountain rescue team have been kitted out with new waterproof clothing to help protect them in foul weather while rescuing injured fell walkers. Team leader Dave Freeborn said: “We have a great deal of specialist rescue equipment, but our greatest resource is the men and women who train and turn out in all weathers to help other mountain users.”

KIRKBY STEPHEN

Funding is to be found by county councillors for the operation of two new civic amenity sites for household waste, including one at Kirkby Stephen. Members of the policy committee agreed additional revenue spending of £130,000 to fund the running costs of civic amenity sites at Millom and Kirkby Stephen.

Six Kirkby Stephen Grammar School students have been awarded the British Canoe Union star open canoe certificate and passed their silver Duke of Edinburgh expedition award into the bargain. To win their awards, the students journeyed by canoe in the Lake District, River Lune, Lancaster Canal, River Ure and River Ouse.

50 YEARS AGO — 1969

PENRITH

Agitation by young people in Penrith produced a remarkable result when they were promised that work would begin in March on the building of a £15,000 youth centre for the town. The project was revealed by the county youth organiser, Mr. Gordon Kidd, when he attended a meeting in Ullswater School which had been called by a number of teenagers who had banded themselves together to campaign for better facilities for youth in the town. Mr. Kidd told the meeting that the new centre would be built near the Tynefield and Ullswater schools and that work was to start in March.

Four toddlers at Penrith had a lunch-date with a difference. They were the guests of a class of fourth-year girls at Tynefield Secondary Modern School, whose domestic science studies include a series on the preparation of meals suitable for different age groups.

CUMBERLAND

The Carlisle Diocese “goes to the polls” in Carlisle Cathedral when, during a special celebration of Holy Eucharist for clergy and lay members of the Carlisle Diocesan Conference, votes will be recorded on the subject of Anglican-Methodist union. The Carlisle Diocesan Conference will be one of the last to record its vote.

COLBY

A Colby girl and her Italian husband will soon be returning home to Montreal, Canada, after a two-month visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Wood, Mid Town, Colby, Appleby. Their daughter, Dorothy, emigrated about five years ago to work in Canada as a children’s nurse, and it was there that she met her husband, Pat DiTomaso, who is a butcher by trade.

KIRKBY STEPHEN

Mrs. Winnie Brockbank, The Crescent, Kirkby Stephen, has recently returned from a visit to Australia to see her son, Geoffrey, who was formerly a pupil at Nateby School and later Kirkby Stephen County School.

100 YEARS AGO — 1919

NENTHEAD

A correspondent writes: “A few years ago, in a series of reminiscences of village life in the Herald, special reference was made to Great Peter of Nenthead, and to Peter’s release from prison at the end of the war. It was said he was imprisoned by the Mining Company for causing an obstruction near the Company’s works. There was some secrecy about the imprisonment. No-one knew what time he had to serve and no-one has been allowed to visit him in his solitary cell. But as the war is nearly finished, and prisoners are being repatriated, it is hoped that Peter will be released and given his old job again.” A timekeeper by calling, Peter was always called great — he was many inches taller than any man in the village and was rather slow of motion, never walking more than two miles a day, and never known to run at all. The writer ends: “If the Mining Company can see their way to release him, I believe the people will want no other war memorial.” (The worthy timekeeper, Peter, is, in fact, a clock.)