In this week in history 25 YEARS AGO — 1994 KIRKBY STEPHEN

Date: Monday 25th February 2019

A young geologist from Kirkby Stephen is busy trying to raise sponsorship to take him on a scientific expedition to the from wastes of a remote part of Iceland. Christopher Gwinnett, who qualified with an HND in geology from Camborne School of Mines, has his sights set on a three-week expedition to Hofsdalur in Iceland.

A young geologist from Kirkby Stephen is busy trying to raise sponsorship to take him on a scientific expedition to the from wastes of a remote part of Iceland. Christopher Gwinnett, who qualified with an HND in geology from Camborne School of Mines, has his sights set on a three-week expedition to Hofsdalur in Iceland.

CUMBRIA

Mystery still surrounds the extent of county overspending on special needs education which led to the suspension of 47-year-old Cumbria Education Director Pat Black. Overspend totals £1.8 million and has been estimated at about £2.5 million in the coming year but several councillors told the “Herald” the budget excess could be well over £5 million.

EDEN

Eden councillors agreed to push for unitary status in the reform of local government — despite claims that the option wasn’t what the people wanted and would cost more. At a special meeting of the council, Liberal Democrat members tried to push through two amendments aimed at adopting the retention of the status quo as Eden’s preferred option. However, the amendments were heavily defeated on both occasions.

KESWICK

Former England cricketer Paul Allott opened a newly-refurbished building society branch in Keswick. The ex-England and Lancashire all-rounder declared the Station Street branch of the Skipton Building Society open. Changes to the branch have included moving the entrance to give better access for the disabled and removing security screens making the office open plan.

PENRITH

The generation game extended to five episodes for a Penrith family following the arrival of James Robert Walton. James Robert is the son of John Walton and Julie Crisp, of Little Langdale, Ambleside. The baby’s arrival, at hospital in Lancaster, marked the fifth generation of the family.

ARMATHWAITE

Walkers have won their fight to retain a riverside footpath at Armathwaite as a public right of way. The decision follows a three-day inquiry in the village in November at which Cumbria County Council sought to have the right of way added to the definitive map to protect its public use. The footpath had been the subject of controversy, following the erection in 1988 of a barricade and locked gate at one end, near the bridge in Armathwaite.

CALTHWAITE

A herd of extremely rare Bagot goats are the latest addition to the collection of unusual animals at Sceugh Mire Farm, near Calthwaite. Sceugh Mire is soon to be opened to the public as the Four Seasons Farm Experience.

50 YEARS AGO — 1969

PENRITH

A Penrith lady is eagerly awaiting her birthday, for on 25th February, Mrs. Eliza Ann Thompson, Castle Drive, who was born in Ruthin, North Wales, will be 100 years old. Mrs. Thompson certainly does not look her age and has many reminiscences of her life in the Penrith district. One of a family of five, she is the eldest daughter of the late Mr. John Rowlands. Her second cousin was the late Sir Morton Stanley, the American journalist who was sent out to find Dr. David Livingstone, the African explorer, and who uttered the much-quoted: “Dr. Livingstone, I presume?” Mrs. Thompson says she has no real secret for such a long and healthy life, but she thinks she would put it down to plenty of work and plenty of walking, but, above all, a good family and a feeling of contentment.

STAINMORE

A determined bid was being made to re-open the A.66 road over Stainmore, which had been closed for two days by the blizzard. Mr. Stuart J. Herbert, North-Eastern Divisional Surveyor to the Westmorland County Council, said: “The wind has eased a bit and we will try to clear the road.” The snowblowers and three snowploughs were being used in the attempt, but Mr Herbert did not think the road would be re-opened before the afternoon.

KIRKBY STEPHEN

As gale-force winds swept across North Westmorland, a large chimney stack was blown from the roof of Mr. M. J. Haughey’s Central Cafe in Market Street, Kirkby Stephen, bringing down about ten tons of masonry. Some of this fell into the street below, but luckily nobody was passing at the time.

100 YEARS AGO — 1919

PENRITH

Penrith Association of Shorthorn Breeders created a new record for Britain in the price paid for a Shorthorn bull when a leading Cumberland breeder, Mr. J. W. Barnes, Aikbank, Wigton, secured the remarkable figure of 4,750 gs. for his champion, “Gartley Lancer”.

ALSTON

The school has been closed for two weeks by Dr. Carson because of an influenza epidemic.

HAWESWATER

A letter from Canon Rawnsley, read at the annual meeting of the Lake District Association at Ambleside, referred to the Manchester Corporation’s water works scheme for the purchase of Haweswater. He said it ought to be insisted that in place of the Dun Bull Inn, Mardale, a famous centre for tourists, which would be submerged if the scheme went through Parliament, the Corporation should provide some house “for the shelter of man and beast benighted, storm-stayed or weary”. The Association decided to take steps to protect the interests of tourists and visitors in Mardale and the district affected by the scheme.