25 YEARS BRAITHWAITE

Date: Friday 15th September 2017
Pupils of Warcop Primary School received a can crusher as a prize from British Nuclear Fuels Limited in recognition of their active involvement in environmental work 25 years ago. BNFL school liaison officer Sylvia Cheetham crushes the first can on the new machine, watched by Warcop pupils.
Pupils of Warcop Primary School received a can crusher as a prize from British Nuclear Fuels Limited in recognition of their active involvement in environmental work 25 years ago. BNFL school liaison officer Sylvia Cheetham crushes the first can on the new machine, watched by Warcop pupils.

Held in Braithwaite Institute, Thornthwaite, Braithwaite and Newlands home and garden show suffered a small financial loss despite an increase in entries and visitors. However, there was an excellent standard of exhibits in all sections except for the garden produce which was affected by recent poor weather.

SHAP

Members of Shap Women’s Institute have raised £153 for the Kivani women’s group in Kenya to further a tailoring workshop. A cheque was presented to vice-president Sarah Howard, who will take the money to the women’s group when she visits Kenya.

PENRITH

Four of Penrith’s most influential bodies have banded together in an alliance to do battle with Eden Council over plans to change the face of the town’s Market Square. The Chamber of Trade, Civic Society, Residents’ Association and Licensed Victuallers’ Association have formed the Penrith Partnership, which aims to reflect public opinion, promote initiatives and address issues in the town. The partnership’s meeting was an emergency gathering in response to news that Eden’s own plans for Market Square were a fait accompli.

Penrith rugby players made history with the club’s first appearance in the Pilkington Cup, the game’s major knock-out competition.

APPLEBY

A real gentleman is the only way to describe Mr. James William Cooper, who celebrated his 100th birthday. Queen Victoria still had several years left to reign when Mr. Cooper was born in Manchester on 15th September, 1892. The son of James and Nelly Cooper, his father worked as a traffic inspector on the railways. School days have faded into a blur but Mr. Cooper clearly remembers that if he was late he would be called in and severely chastised. One of his first memories is that of soldiers going off to the Boer War.

KESWICK

A Keswick man on an aid trip to Russia found himself involved in a peace-keeping trip to civil war-torn Georgia. Mr. John Roe, a member of Keswick Lions Club, had just arrived in Moscow with a consignment of supplies when the Minister of Nationalities asked if he would accompany some consignments to the troubled region of South Ossetia, Georgia. After arriving the party found themselves close to a rocket attack by rebels based in the mountains, but were able to rescue 20 war orphans and take them to a safer life in Moscow.

A couple who have adopted Keswick as their home celebrated their diamond wedding anniversary. John and Jessie Blackburn were married at Stockton-on-Tees, where they were born, and lived there until 1985. Jessie was a secretary in a lawyers’ office, but has spent all her married life happily doing household duties and supporting her husband in all that he has done.

50 YEARS

WARCOP

A Warcop lady, Miss Annie Copley, Eden Vale, celebrated her 90th birthday. She was born at Wakefield on 13th September, 1877. She entered the service of the late Mr. John Murgatroyd, Broadfield Hall, Luddenden, Yorks., as children’s nurse in June, 1904, and had remained in the family ever since, coming to live at Warcop in May, 1949, with Col. and Mrs. E. M. Dickenson. Mrs. Dickenson is the youngest daughter of the late Mr. Murgatroyd.

CUMBRIA

The new Chief Constable of the Cumbria Police Force is Mr. William Thomas Cavey, who has been Chief Constable of Brighton for the past five years. He is 52.

WESTMORLAND

With perfect hot weather, more attractions and substantial entries in all but the cattle classes, the organisers of Westmorland County Show at Kendal were considering the event to be the most successful for many years.

PENRITH

A former Penrithian and her husband are flying out to the remote Ascension Isle in the Atlantic. They are Mrs. Lilian Heale and her husband, Mr. John Heale, who will be abroad for at least two years. Mrs. Heale is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Thompson, Wetheriggs Rise. Her husband, a B.B.C. engineer, is going to work on a project abroad.

100 YEARS

PENRITH

Something like consternation has been caused in Penrith by the announcement that the famous Beacon, which shelters the town to the north and east, and which is Penrith’s “beauty spot,” is to be cleared of every tree as a sacrifice to the war effort. The wood covers an area of 311 acres, and the hill, which is heavily covered in larch and pine, rises to a height of 900 feet above sea level. Some of the wood has already fallen to the woodman’s axe but it was hoped that it would only be carefully thinned out. The timber is required in France and Belgium, but it is a tragedy that the beautiful old Beacon should be cleared.

APPLEBY

For years untold, Saturday has been the recognised market day at Appleby, and it has been a very convenient arrangement for the tradesmen. Now, new conditions have arisen, which makes the change to Friday desirable, but opinion is divided. The curtailment of the train service has cut Appleby off from her market produce customers, and if the market were held on a Friday, it would enable the traders to distribute the produce to the larger markets on a Saturday. However, at a meeting, it was decided by a majority vote, to allow no interference with the Saturday market.